Business

January 16, 2013

Raytheon awarded $12.3 million contract for HARM upgrade

The U.S. Air Force has awarded Raytheon a $12.3 million contract to begin full rate production of High-Speed Anti-Radiation Missile Control Section Modification upgrade units. Raytheon received the award as the result of a down-select competition.

The modification adds a GPS receiver and an improved inertial measurement unit for precision navigation to the existing HARM. HCSM also features a digital flight computer that merges targeting solutions from navigation and seeker systems. These enhancements improve the probability of hit, while controlling where the missile can and cannot fly.

“Leveraging several years of experience with HARM, Raytheon’s HCSM will provide the Air Force with enhanced capability and accuracy, while simultaneously reducing collateral damage or risk of fratricide,” said Chuck Pinney, HARM program director for Raytheon Missile Systems. “HCSM will fill a critical capability need for the war fighter.”

Raytheon is scheduled to begin modification of existing HARMs early this year with delivery of HCSM units beginning in the fourth quarter of 2013. Raytheon has teamed with Honeywell, Rockwell Collins and others for the HCSM program.

The contract was awarded in Raytheon’s fourth quarter of 2012.

About HARM and HCSM

The AGM-88 High-Speed Anti-Radiation Missile is a key battlefield element to suppress or destroy surface-to-air missile radars, early warning radars and radar-directed air defense artillery systems. HARMs have made hostile airspaces worldwide safer for U.S. and allied warfighters. The missile resides in the inventories of eight countries.

  • More than 4,000 HARMs have been employed in combat.
  • HCSM adds GPS/IMU navigation accuracy, giving HARM the ability to engage time-critical targets.
  • HCSM has new features that degrade counter-HARM tactics, while reducing the risk of fratricide or collateral damage.

 




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