In the news...

January 23, 2013

News Briefs – January 23, 2013

U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,044

As of Jan. 22, 2012, at least 2,044 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count.

At least 1,705 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result of hostile action, according to the military’s numbers.

Outside of Afghanistan, the department reports at least 118 more members of the U.S. military died in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Of those, 11 were the result of hostile action.

The AP count of total OEF casualties outside of Afghanistan is five more than the department’s tally.

The Defense Department also counts three military civilian deaths.

Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 18,201 U.S. service members have been wounded in hostile action, according to the Defense Department. AP

Germany draws line at carrying French ammo to Mali

Germany won’t transport ammunition to help France with its military intervention in Mali.

The Defense Ministry confirmed a report Jan. 21 by Der Spiegel that Germany has a ìred card holderî stationed at a joint airbase in the Netherlands whose job is to make sure French arms aren’t being loaded onto German planes.

The move comes despite German government assurances that it would consider providing ìlogisticalî support to France in its effort to stop the advance of Islamist militants against the Malian government.

Der Spiegel reported that two German military transport planes being dispatched to ferry African soldiers to Mali will, however, carry medical supplies for French troops to the country. AP

France: 1,000 African troops now in Mali

France says there are now about 1,000 African troops in Mali to take part in the military intervention to dislodge Islamic militants from power.

Col. Thierry Burkhard, the French military spokesman, says the soldiers come from Nigeria, Togo, Benin, Niger and Chad.

France has 2,150 forces in Mali, and has received logistical support from Western allies and intelligence from the United States.

But the French ultimately hope that West African soldiers will take the lead alongside Malian troops in securing the country, a former French colony.

Neighboring African countries are expected to contribute around 3,000 troops but concerns about the mission have delayed some from sending their promised troops.

France launched its operation Jan. 11, a day after the Islamists ventured south from their strongholds and seized a town. AP

U.S. begins transporting French troops to Mali

U.S. Africa Command says American planes have begun transporting French troops and equipment in support of the country’s mission in Mali.

Tom Saunders, a spokesman for U.S. Africa Command in Stuttgart, Germany said Jan. 22 that the U.S. Air Force C-17 transport began flights on Jan. 21 from the French base in Istres, France, to Bamako.

He said two flights arrived in Bamako Jan. 21and a third arrived Jan. 22.

Saunders said the missions will operate over the next several days. He said he could not give any details on how many more flights were envisioned for operational security reasons, and referred any questions about how much equipment and how many soldiers were being transported to the French Ministry of Defense. AP




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines September 2, 2014

News: Debris yields clues that pilot never ejected - When investigators were finally able to safely enter the crash site of an F-15C “Eagle” fighter jet on the afternoon of Aug. 27, they made a grim discovery that concluded more than 30 hours of searching – the pilot never managed to eject from the aircraft.  ...
 
 

News Briefs September 2, 2014

Pentagon: Iraq operations cost $560 million so far U.S. military operations in Iraq, including airstrikes and surveillance flights, have cost about $560 million since mid-June, the Pentagon said Aug. 29. Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Pentagon press secretary, said the average daily cost has been $7.5 million. He said it began at a much lower...
 
 

Unmanned aircraft partnership reaches major milestone

A team of research students and staff from Warsaw University of Technology have successfully demonstrated the first phase of flight test and integration of unmanned aircraft platforms with an autonomous mission control system. The demonstration marks a significant milestone in a partnership between the university and Lockheed Martin that began earlier this year. This is...
 

 

Raytheon delivers first Block 2 Rolling Airframe Missiles to US Navy

Raytheon delivered the first Block 2 variant of its Rolling Airframe Missile system to the U.S. Navy as part of the company’s 2012 Low Rate Initial Production contract. RAM Block 2 is a significant performance upgrade featuring enhanced kinematics, an evolved radio frequency receiver, and an improved control system. “As today’s threats continue to evolve,...
 
 
Courtesy photograph

Two Vietnam War Soldiers, one from Civil War to receive Medal of Honor

U.S. Army graphic Retired Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. Adkins and former Spc. 4 Donald P. Sloat will receive the Medal of Honor for actions in Vietnam. The White House announced Aug. 26 that Retired Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. A...
 
 

Sparks fly as NASA pushes limits of 3-D printing technology

NASA has successfully tested the most complex rocket engine parts ever designed by the agency and printed with additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, on a test stand at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. NASA engineers pushed the limits of technology by designing a rocket engine injector – a highly complex part that...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>