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February 8, 2013

News Briefs February 8, 2013

787 battery approval should be reconsidered

A top federal safety official says the U.S. government should reconsider its approval of the kind of batteries used in the Boeing 787 Dreamliner because they can explode into fires, a specter that manufacturer testing did not pick up.

National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Deborah Hersman said Feb. 7 that Boeing’s safety testing of the batteries before they won approval from the Federal Aviation Administration showed that a short-circuit in one of the battery’s eight cells could be retained in that cell.

But the NTSB’s investigation of a Jan. 7 battery fire in a Japan Airlines 787 parked at Boston’s Logan International Airport shows the short-circuiting quickly spread to the battery’s other cells, creating a cascading, uncontrolled chemical reaction that sparked the fire. AP

 

Vets groups’ praise for Hagel adds pressure on GOP

Countering the Republican-led opposition to President Barack Obama’s nominee for defense secretary is a less flashy but powerful constituency: military veterans.

Veterans’ organizations have praised Chuck Hagel, a twice-wounded combat veteran of Vietnam and deputy administrator in President Ronald Reagan’s Veterans Administration.

Republican-leaning outside groups have waged a well-funded campaign against Hagel in hopes of pressuring senators.

The former two-term Republican senator from Nebraska said in a letter to the committee that he has been forthright in providing all required information. AP

 

Sandia boss says job cuts unlikely due to budget

A top official at Sandia National Laboratories say managers have been tightening the labs’ fiscal belt enough that they should be able to avoid job cuts despite current federal budget troubles.

The nuclear weapons lab is located at Kirtland Air Force Base and is a major employer in the Albuquerque area with more than 10,000 jobs.

President Paul Hommert says there’s still uncertainty but that layoffs are unlikely.

According to the Albuquerque Journal, Hommert sees cutting back on hiring as the course to take if federal budget cuts are deeper than anticipated. AP

 

Japan says two Russian fighters entered its airspace

Japan’s Defense Ministry says two Russian fighters briefly intruded into Japanese airspace off the northern tip of the island of Hokkaido.

Ministry official Yoshihide Yoshida says the intrusion Feb. 7, which lasted less than a minute, caused Japan’s air force to scramble.

Yoshida says it was not immediately known whether the airspace violation was intentional or accidental, but that it was “extremely problematic.”

He says the last intrusion by Russian jets in Japanese airspace was on Feb. 9, 2008. AP

 

 




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Headlines April 21, 2014

News: Former Ranger breaks silence on Pat Tillman death: I may have killed him - Almost 10 years after the friendly fire death of former NFL star turned Army Ranger Pat Tillman, a fellow ranger admits that he may have been the one who fired the fatal shot.   Business: Ship study should favor existing designs -...
 
 

News Briefs April 21, 2014

Navy OKs changes for submariners’ sleep schedules The U.S. Navy has endorsed changes to submarine sailors’ schedules based on research into sleep patterns by a military laboratory in Connecticut. With no sunlight to set day apart from night on a submarine, the Navy for decades has staggered sailors’ working hours on schedules with little resemblance...
 
 

NASA cargo launches to space station aboard SpaceX resupply mission

Nearly 2.5 tons of NASA science investigations and cargo are on the way to the International Space Station aboard SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft. The spacecraft launched atop a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 3:25 p.m., EDT, April 18. The mission is the company’s third...
 

 

Second series of CASIS-sponsored research payloads launch to ISS

The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space is proud to announce several sponsored research payloads have launched to the International Space Station onboard the Space Exploration Technology Corporation’s Dragon cargo capsule. This marks the second series of investigations headed to the station that are sponsored by CASIS, the nonprofit responsible for managing research...
 
 

Boeing to give California workers $47 million in back pay

PALMDALE, Calif. – Boeing will pay $47 million to hundreds of current and former Southern California employees who are owed back pay and benefits, a union announced April 18. An arbitrator ruled against the aerospace giant in January and laid down guidelines for the payments and interest, but it took months to cull through records...
 
 

NASA selects commercial crew program manager

NASA has selected Kathy Lueders as program manager for the agency’s Commercial Crew Program. Lueders, who has served as acting program manager since October 2013, will help keep the nation’s space program on course to launch astronauts from American soil by 2017 aboard spacecraft built by American companies. “This is a particularly critical time for...
 




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