In the news...

February 11, 2013

Headlines: February 11, 2013

Business

EADS unit could face FBI probe over Saudi deal

The FBI is investigating allegations of corruption involving a British unit of aerospace group EADS over a contract in Saudi Arabia for the U.K.’s Ministry of Defence, the Financial Times said Feb. 11.

 

Veterans

‘I would have destroyed Dresden again’: Bomber Harris was unrepentant over German city raids 30 years after the end of World War Two

The RAF commander who ordered the controversial fire-bombing of Dresden which killed an estimated 25,000 civilians during World War II said he would do it again in a long lost interview filmed 30 years after the end of the conflict.

 

Viewpoint

Drones memo extends executive power, so let’s just let Skynet decide from now on

by Jason Linkins, Huffington Post

Last week, after Michael Isikoff obtained a 16-page memorandum detailing the legal opinions that underpin the Obama administration’s program of targeted assassinations – a program whose fatal purview extends to American citizens – the grand debate over drone strikes and executive power and how the checks and balances work in this post-9/11 world were newly inflamed.

Obama and drones: Unkept promises

by James Zogby, President, Arab American Institute

I find deeply troubling the White House claim that their use of drones to assassinate suspected terrorists is “legal, ethical and wise”. The release of a Department of Justice “White Paper” that purports to establish the Administration’s legal justification for these killings only compounds my concern.

Drone On

by Gary Schmitt, The Weekly Standard

During World War II, a small number of German Americans fought for Nazi Germany as members of the Waffen-SS. Does anyone think the U.S. military would have given a second thought to whether it might kill those traitors—whether they were found on the battlefield, in a planning cell back in Berlin, or even in some third country involved in secret operations to disrupt the Allied effort?

 

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines September 2, 2014

News: Debris yields clues that pilot never ejected - When investigators were finally able to safely enter the crash site of an F-15C “Eagle” fighter jet on the afternoon of Aug. 27, they made a grim discovery that concluded more than 30 hours of searching – the pilot never managed to eject from the aircraft.  ...
 
 

News Briefs September 2, 2014

Pentagon: Iraq operations cost $560 million so far U.S. military operations in Iraq, including airstrikes and surveillance flights, have cost about $560 million since mid-June, the Pentagon said Aug. 29. Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Pentagon press secretary, said the average daily cost has been $7.5 million. He said it began at a much lower...
 
 

Unmanned aircraft partnership reaches major milestone

A team of research students and staff from Warsaw University of Technology have successfully demonstrated the first phase of flight test and integration of unmanned aircraft platforms with an autonomous mission control system. The demonstration marks a significant milestone in a partnership between the university and Lockheed Martin that began earlier this year. This is...
 

 

Raytheon delivers first Block 2 Rolling Airframe Missiles to US Navy

Raytheon delivered the first Block 2 variant of its Rolling Airframe Missile system to the U.S. Navy as part of the company’s 2012 Low Rate Initial Production contract. RAM Block 2 is a significant performance upgrade featuring enhanced kinematics, an evolved radio frequency receiver, and an improved control system. “As today’s threats continue to evolve,...
 
 
Courtesy photograph

Two Vietnam War Soldiers, one from Civil War to receive Medal of Honor

U.S. Army graphic Retired Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. Adkins and former Spc. 4 Donald P. Sloat will receive the Medal of Honor for actions in Vietnam. The White House announced Aug. 26 that Retired Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. A...
 
 

Sparks fly as NASA pushes limits of 3-D printing technology

NASA has successfully tested the most complex rocket engine parts ever designed by the agency and printed with additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, on a test stand at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. NASA engineers pushed the limits of technology by designing a rocket engine injector – a highly complex part that...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>