Space

February 11, 2013

NASA unveils Strategic Space Technology investment plan

NASA’s Strategic Space Technology Investment Plan has been posted to the agency’s website. The comprehensive strategic plan prioritizes space technologies essential to the pursuit of NASA’s mission and achievement of national goals.

The NASA Strategic Space Technology Investment Plan was created following development of a series of agency draft Space Technology Roadmaps. After careful review of the roadmaps by the National Research Council, with input from the public and key stakeholders, NASA finalized this new investment plan. It provides guidance for NASA’s space technology investments during the next four years, within the context of a 20-year horizon. The plan will be updated approximately every two years, as appropriate, to meet agency and national needs.

“Technology enables discovery and advancement,” NASA Chief Technologist Mason Peck said. “We look forward to working with our stakeholders to grow our technological base and take the journey to expand scientific understanding, explore the universe, and make a positive impact on the lives of all.”

In 2010, the president and Congress unveiled an ambitious new direction for NASA, which includes renewed investment in space technology to align mission directorate activities, increase capabilities, lower mission costs and support long-term needs. The result has been an aggressive and prioritized technology investment by NASA that enables exploration and science missions while also supporting other government and commercial space activities. The plan is based on a four-pillar system of goals to ensure NASA investments optimize the benefits of key stakeholders, other U.S. government agencies, the private sector and the national economy.

NASA recognizes the importance of a balanced portfolio of technology development at all stages of technology maturity. Using the Strategic Space Technology Investment Plan, NASA will continue to invest in revolutionary concepts that help develop the nation’s work force and provide transformative and crosscutting technology breakthroughs to enable our missions and benefit the commercial sector.

To review the Strategic Space Technology Investment Plan and learn more about NASA’s investment in space technology, visit http://www.nasa.gov/oct.

 




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