In the news...

February 20, 2013

Headlines: February 20, 2013

Business

Boeing close to fixing Dreamliner battery

Boeing has found a way to fix battery problems on its grounded 787 Dreamliner jets that involves increasing the space between the lithium ion battery cells, a source familiar with the company’s plans says.

As parked 787s multiply, Boeing cash drain worries grow

Paine Field Airport, next to Boeing’s widebody plant north of Seattle, is getting crowded as 10 new 787 Dreamliners flank the runway, sparkling with contrasting and colorful liveries, including Poland’s LOT, Britain’s Thomson Airways and China Southern Airlines.

Fitch: U.S. sequestration no big threat for European aerospace, defense companies

Fitch Ratings believes that the threat of sequestration in the U.S. looms over the defense sector once again, but it’s unlikely that large European defense contractors will face an immediate significant deterioration in their operation performance or negative rating pressure in the event that it comes into effect.

 

Defense

Juggling priorities, Pentagon tries to protecting war funding, troops

The U.S. Air Force Space Command cautioned recently that if new budget cuts take effect, some of its round-the-clock missile-warning operations would begin working bankers’ hours – raising concerns about detecting missiles targeting America.

Army plans to cut more than 300,000 from civilian workforce

The Army is planning to furlough and/or lay off as many as 302,626 civilian workers across the country due to budget concerns, according to an official document obtained by The Washington Times.

 

Veterans

United Kingdom: State-of-the-art ‘bionic limbs’ for Armed Forces 

British Defense Secretary Phillip Hammond says the government has pledged that all injured soldiers will get the most up-to-date prosthetic limbs available.

 

Space

Exoplanet Kepler 37b is tiniest yet – smaller than Mercury

Astronomers have smashed the record for the smallest planet beyond our Solar System – finding one only slightly larger than our Moon. To spot the tiny, probably rocky planet, they first needed to precisely measure the size of its host star.

‘Vulcan’ leads Pluto moon name vote

Star Trek fans have something to rejoice in: “Vulcan” is the leading contender in a vote to name two of Pluto’s recently discovered moons.

 

Technology

U.S. Air Force developing terrifying swarms of tiny unmanned drones that can hover, crawl and even kill targets

The U.S. Air Force is developing tiny unmanned drones that will fly in swarms, hover like bees, crawl like spiders and even sneak up on unsuspecting targets and execute them with lethal precision.

 

International

UAE close to deciding between British, French fighters

The United Arab Emirates is close to deciding whether to buy British or French fighter jets, after nearly five years of talks and numerous diplomatic visits.

Israel, Turkey in first defense deal since ties frozen

An Israeli firm has supplied Turkey with military equipment in the first such reported deal since the two nations froze ties over the 2010 killing of nine Turks aboard a Gaza-bound aid ship, Turkish government sources said Feb. 18.

United Kingdom: Red Arrows ‘future safe under David Cameron’

The future of the Royal Air Force’s Red Arrows is safe as long as David Cameron is prime minister, Number 10 has said.

 

 

 




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Headlines October 1, 2014

Veterans: Substantial VA staff will face discipline - A substantial number of VA employees will face punishment for the veterans treatment scandal, the new national commander of the American Legion predicted Sept. 30, indicating that the slow pace of discipline has more to do with the hoops the department must jump through than it does a...
 
 

News Briefs October 1, 2014

Egypt president gives army control of arms imports The Egyptian president has amended a law, giving the country’s army control over weapons and ammunition imports. The Sept. 30 statement from the presidency says Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi changed articles stipulating that a permit for weapons’ imports has to be granted by the Interior Ministry, which is in...
 
 
atk-test

ATK successfully tests Orion launch abort motor igniter

NASA and ATK successfully completed a static test of the launch abort motor igniter for the Orion crew capsule’s Launch Abort System. Conducted at ATK’s facility in Promontory, Utah, this test is the next step towa...
 

 
uav-coalition

Small UAV coalition launched to advance commercial use of unmanned aerial vehicles

Leading technology companies Oct. 1 formally announced the formation of the Small UAV Coalition to help pave the way for commercial, philanthropic, and civil use of small unmanned aerial vehicles in the United States and abroad...
 
 
Navy photograph

NAWCWD manned for unmanned systems

Navy photograph A rail launch is performed during Integrator unmanned aerial vehicle testing at Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division China Lake, Calif. Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division scientists, engineers, techn...
 
 
NASA photograph by Ken Ulbrich

NASA employees go ‘above and beyond’

Courtesy photograph NASA Chief Scientist Albion Bowers, Christopher Miller and Nelson Brown receive the Exception Engineering Achievement Medal at Armstrong Research Center, Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. The prestigious award ...
 




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