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February 25, 2013

Lawmakers seek end to draft registration

Two lawmakers are waging a little-noticed campaign to abolish the Selective Service System, the independent federal agency that manages draft registration.

Reps. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., and Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Colo., say the millions of dollars the agency spends each year preparing for the possibility of a military draft is a waste of money. They say the Pentagon has no interest in returning to conscription due to the success of the all-volunteer force.

Here’s a quick look at the Selective Service System:

The Selective Service has a budget of $24 million and a full-time staff of 130. It maintains a database of about 17 million potential male draftees. In the event of a draft, the agency would mobilize as many as 11,000 volunteers to serve on local draft boards that would decide if exemptions or deferments to military service were warranted.

The Selective Service is an ìinexpensive insurance policy,î said Lawrence Romo, the agencyís director. We are the true backup for the true emergency.
Men between the ages of 18 and 25 are required to register and can do so online or by mail. Those who fail to register with the Selective Service can be charged with a felony. The Justice Department hasnít prosecuted anyone for that offense since 1986.

There can be other consequences, though. Failing to register can mean the loss of financial aid for college, being refused employment with the federal government, and denied U.S. citizenship.

DeFazio says it makes no sense to threaten to penalize men who donít register when the odds of a draft are so remote.

Past attempts to get rid of the agency have failed, DeFazio says, because too many of his colleagues on Capitol Hill worry that closing Selective Service down will make them look weak on national security.

There is no one who wants this except ëchicken hawk members of Congress,î DeFazio says, using a term to describe a person who pushes for the use of military power but never served in the armed forces. AP




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