Business

March 11, 2013

Boeing to consolidate flight training facilities in North America

The Miami campus building, the largest campus in the Boeing Flight Services global training network. After the consolidation, Miami will be established as the pro forma training campus for Boeing in the Americas.

Boeing announced March 8 it is consolidating flight training capabilities in North America ñ including 787 flight and maintenance training at the Boeing Flight Services training campus in Miami, Fla.

The consolidation is part of a larger Commercial Airplanes focus on customer commitments, stepping up efforts to meet market demand for Boeing products, services and support as airplane delivery rates increase.

Boeing will relocate all full-flight simulators and other devices from Seattle to Miami, starting with two 787 training suites. Miami is Boeing’s largest commercial aviation training campus and is a preferred training location for customers based in Latin America as well as the United States, Middle East, Europe and elsewhere. With this consolidation, Miami will be established as the pro forma flight training location for Boeing in the Americas.
Implementation will begin immediately.

The Flight Services Seattle campus provides customer training on two 787 full-flight simulators and a number of other airplane models. Pictured here, one of the two simulator bays at the Renton, Wash., facility.

“This is about getting close to our customers, doing what is right for them and bringing them the best product support and services in the industry,” said Sherry Carbary, vice president, Flight Services, Commercial Aviation Services. “If we are going to better serve our customers and meet training commitments and airplane deliveries as we ramp up on rate, the time to do this is now.”

With 20 simulator bays, the Miami facility is one of the largest commercial flight training campuses in the world, but currently that space is underutilized, with 11 training devices and the capacity to accommodate nine additional full-flight simulators.

The majority of the Seattle Flight Services team will not be affected, but some employees will be impacted by the planned consolidation, Carbary said. “Our training team is the best in the industry. We value the contributions they bring to Boeing every day, and the competitive advantage they bring to our customers around the world.”

The plan to locate 787 training in Miami was announced in 2008 as part of Boeing’s strategy to better serve the training requirements of airlines by locating training closer to where they do business.

Over the past several years Boeing has consolidated and relocated a number of flight training campuses, including four in the United States, based on customer requirements. Boeing Flight Services, a part of Boeing Commercial Aviation Services, has also continued to expand capabilities elsewhere across the global network including new campuses in Shanghai; Baku, Azerbaijan; and Istanbul and is expanding capabilities at existing campuses in Singapore and London with additional new full-flight simulators.

Strategic positioning of the Boeing global training network is of vital importance to airlines around the world as they seek world-class training resources to meet the demand for aviation personnel. The 2012 Boeing Pilot & Technician Outlook, a respected industry forecast of required commercial aviation personnel, cites a need for 460,000 new pilots and 601,000 new maintenance technicians over the next 20 years.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Unmanned aircraft partnership reaches major milestone

A team of research students and staff from Warsaw University of Technology have successfully demonstrated the first phase of flight test and integration of unmanned aircraft platforms with an autonomous mission control system. The demonstration marks a significant milestone in a partnership between the university and Lockheed Martin that began earlier this year. This is...
 
 

Raytheon delivers first Block 2 Rolling Airframe Missiles to US Navy

Raytheon delivered the first Block 2 variant of its Rolling Airframe Missile system to the U.S. Navy as part of the company’s 2012 Low Rate Initial Production contract. RAM Block 2 is a significant performance upgrade featuring enhanced kinematics, an evolved radio frequency receiver, and an improved control system. “As today’s threats continue to evolve,...
 
 
Navy photograph

General Dynamics delivers submarine on schedule and, under target cost

Navy photograph The PCU North Dakota (SSN 784) during bravo sea trials. The crew performed exceptionally well on both alpha and bravo sea trials. The submarine North Dakota is the 11th ship of the Virginia class, the first U.S....
 

 
boeing-xiamen

Boeing, Xiamen Airlines celebrate airline’s first 787 Dreamliner Delivery

Boeing and Xiamen Airlines Aug. 29 celebrated the delivery of the airline’s first 787 Dreamliner. “We are excited to receive our first 787 Dreamliner which is also the first widebody airplane of our all-Boeing fleet...
 
 
LM-C5

Double Deuce

A U.S. Air Force crew ferried the 22nd C-5M Super Galaxy from the Lockheed Martin facilities in Marietta, Ga., Aug. 25. Aircraft 86-0011 was ferried by a crew led by Maj. Gen. Dwyer L. Dennis, Director, Global Reach Programs, O...
 
 
Northrop Grumman photograph

First ever RQ-4 Global Hawk hits 100th flight on NASA mission

Northrop Grumman photograph A historical look at the first Global Hawk (AV1) during its maiden flight over Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., on Feb. 28, 1998. AV1 has made history again with its 100th flight in support of NASA en...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>