Space

March 20, 2013

Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne powers ULA Atlas V upper stage, placing early-warning missile satellite into orbit

CANOGA PARK, Calif. – An Atlas V launch vehicle rose from the pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., March 19 to deliver the second Space Based Infrared System Geosynchronous satellite GEO 2 into orbit – thanks to propulsion provided by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne and RD AMROSS.

The United Launch Alliance Atlas V is powered by the RD AMROSS RD-180 booster engine and a Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne RL10A-4-2 upper-stage engine. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne is a United Technologies Corp. company. RD AMROSS LLC is a joint venture of Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne and NPO Energomash.
“With its third mission in as many months, the RL10 is off to an excellent start in its 50th year of successfully placing payloads into orbit,” said Christine Cooley, RL10 program manager, Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne. “Congratulations to the entire RL10 team for another job well done.”
“The RD-180 continues to show its muster in boosting payloads into space,” said Bill Parsons, president and CEO of RD AMROSS. “We look forward to working with our customers and providing reliable power to launch on future missions.”
The SBIRS program features a mix of satellites in geosynchronous orbit that are designed to provide resilient and improved missile-warning capabilities for the nation and allied countries. The satellites also contribute toward missile defense and technical intelligence for the U.S. military.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Image courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA’s WISE spacecraft discovers most luminous galaxy in universe

Image courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech This artist’s concept depicts the current record holder for the most luminous galaxy in the universe. The galaxy, WISE J224607.57-052635.0, is erupting with light equal to more than 300 ...
 
 

Air Force launches hush-hush mini-shuttle into space

A mysterious space plane rocketed into orbit May 20, carrying no crew but a full load of technology experiments. The Air Force launched its unmanned mini-shuttle late morning, May 20. An Atlas V rocket lifted it up and out over the Atlantic. This is the fourth flight for the military research program, which is shrouded...
 
 
Image courtesy NASA TV

Critical NASA research returns to Earth aboard U.S. SpaceX Dragon spacecraft

Image courtesy NASA TV The SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft was released from the International Space Station’s robotic arm at 7:04 a.m., EDT, May 21. The capsule then performed a series of departure burns and maneuvers to ...
 

 

NASA, Canadian agency renew agreement to reduce aviation icing risks

On hand to sign the renewal agreement May 21 at the NRC offices in Ottawa, Ontario, were Jaiwon Shin, associate administrator of NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate in Washington, and Ian Potter, the NRC’s vice-president of engineering. “The combined efforts of our two agencies will help solve some of the most difficult and challenging weather-related...
 
 
ULA photograph

Space and Missile Systems Center successfully launches the AFSPC-5 mission

ULA photograph An Atlas V rocket successfully launches the AFSPC-5 mission from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., May 20, 2015.   The Air Force and its mission partners successfully launched the AFSPC-5 mission aboar...
 
 

NASA’s CubeSat initiative aids in testing of technology for solar sails in space

With help from NASA, a small research satellite to test technology for in-space solar propulsion launched into space May 20 aboard an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., as part of the agency’s CubeSat Launch Initiative. The Atlas V sent the U.S. Air Force’s X-37B space plane on its fourth mission,...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>