Business

April 15, 2013

Lockheed Martin’s Nemesis Missile scores 3-for-3 in flight tests

Lockheed Martin successfully demonstrated the launch, guided flight, target acquisition and precision strike capability of its Nemesis missile in three flight tests at White Sands Missile Range, N.M.

Nemesis is a man-portable, surface-launched missile that enables war fighters to engage targets with precision lethality from as close as 100 meters to well beyond line of sight. The missile can be employed during dismounted operations as well as be adapted for employment from various ground, maritime or airborne platforms.

“Nemesis provides critical performance to forward-deployed troops in response to a stated warfighter capability gap,” said Frank St. John, vice president of tactical missiles and combat maneuver systems at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. “War fighters must be able to trust that the weapons they deploy will deliver the intended effects every time. Our three-for-three flight tests demonstrate the missile is reliable and lethal.”

In the first two tests, Nemesis demonstrated vertical launch, GPS navigation to targets located at distances of eight and 12 kilometers, engagement by the missile’s semi-active laser seeker and live warhead detonation. In both flights, Nemesis performed flawlessly, destroying the intended targets. The successful third shot demonstrated the vertical launch of an inert round, followed by GPS-only navigation to a target positioned just 100 meters away.

Nemesis is fired vertically from its launch tube, enabling 360-degree engagement capability. A combat-proven rocket motor, deployable wing and GPS guidance enable the missile to engage targets in excess of 12 kilometers. The missile’s SAL seeker activates in the terminal phase of flight to provide precision accuracy and minimize collateral damage. The user is also able to select height of burst or point-detonation fuzing options to optimize lethality against enemy personnel, light armored vehicles and structures.

Nemesis’s ability to be deployed from airborne Common Launch Tubes fulfills existing Special Operations Forces and U.S. Marine Corps requirements for a standoff precision guided munition. The missile can also be configured for internal or external carriage on other fixed- and rotary-wing platforms. Nemesis’ versatility enables it to contribute to a wide array of critical missions.

Lockheed Martin funded the development of the Nemesis missile, building upon proven technologies from demonstrated systems, including Hellfire II, DAGR and Scorpion. Using components from these systems reduces risk and shortens the time from initial development to participation in government-funded flight tests.

Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control is a 2012 recipient of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award for performance excellence. The Malcolm Baldrige Award represents the highest honor that can be awarded to American companies for achievement in leadership, strategic planning, customer relations, measurement, analysis, workforce excellence, operations and business results.

 




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