Space

April 15, 2013

NASA announces challenges for 2013 International Space Apps Challenge

NASA and more than 150 partner organizations worldwide will be hosting the International Space Apps Challenge April 20-21, 2013.

The International Space Apps Challenge is a technology development event during which citizens from around the world work together to solve challenges relevant to improving life on Earth and in space.

NASA and its partners have released 50 challenges for the second International Space Apps Challenge. Participants are encouraged to develop software, hardware, data visualization, and mobile/web applications that will contribute to space exploration missions and help improve life on Earth. Examples of challenges include:

 

  • Spot the Station: Extend the functionality of the Spot the Station website (spotthestation.nasa.gov) that allows you to share your sightings of the International Space Station with others.
  • Hitch a Ride to Mars: Design a CubeSat (a small research satellite) for an upcoming Mars mission.
  • 3-D Printing Challenge: Create an open source model of space hardware that can be generated by a 3-D printer.
  • Curiosity at Home: Foster a connection between citizens and the Mars rover through software, visualizations, or an app.
  • Seven Minutes of Science: Develop a concept to make use of 330 pounds (150 kilograms) of ejectable mass during the entry and landing phase of a Mars mission to accomplish scientific or technical objectives.
  • Catch a Meteor: Create an app that would allow observers of a meteor shower to trace the location, color and size of the meteor.
  • Smart Cities, Smart Climate: Explore the impacts of atmospheric changes on the health, infrastructure and society in urban areas.
  • Why We Explore Space: Share the “why” of space exploration through the creation of compelling narratives and visualizations.

 

To register for a local International Space Apps Challenge event and to find more information, visit http://spaceappschallenge.org.

 




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