Business

April 15, 2013

Pratt & Whitney completes U.S. Air Force C-17 program of record for F117 production install engines

Pratt & Whitney, a unit of United Technologies Corp., has completed production install F117 engine deliveries for the U.S. Air Force, marking more than 20 years of successfully powering the C-17 Globemaster III aircraft.

The engines were recently shipped to Triumph Aerostructures in Dallas, Texas for nacelle installation and will then ship to Boeing’s final assembly facility in Long Beach, Calif., to be installed in the 223rd U.S. Air Force C-17 aircraft, completing the program of record.

Pratt & Whitney will continue delivering spare F117 engines to the U.S. Air Force and production install engines to international customers, including India’s order for 10 C-17s.

“The F117 engine on the C-17 supports the U.S. Air Force’s ability to provide long-range, strategic and tactical airlift capability, humanitarian aid and peacekeeping activities around the globe, and that is something we are very proud of here at Pratt & Whitney,” said Bev Deachin, vice president, Pratt & Whitney Military and Customer Support. “We look forward to ongoing support of the U.S. Air Force C-17 fleet with engine spares and continued production of the F117 to power C-17s for customers around the world.”

The F117-PW-100 first entered service in 1993 and is a member of Pratt & Whitney’s PW2000 family of commercial engines. With more than 10 million hours of proven military service and 50 million hours in commercial use, the F117/PW2040 has consistently proven itself as a world-class dependable engine.

The maturity of the engine and Pratt & Whitney’s continual investment in product improvements has resulted in outstanding safety and reliability metrics. The F117 engine recently exceeded 9,000 hours in mean time between removal, one of the highest seen in the U.S. Air Force fleet, contributing greatly to affordable life cycle cost. The engine is also widely recognized as the most efficient engine in its class at all available thrust levels.

 




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