Business

April 24, 2013

Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne reaches milestone in development of next rocket engine for human spaceflight

CANOGA PARK, Calif. – Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, the rocket-engine manufacturer that helped power American astronauts to the moon during the Apollo era, has completed the last in a series of hot-fire tests on a J-2X engine with a stub-nozzle extension at simulated altitude conditions.
This latest chapter in the development of America’s next rocket engine paves the way toward full-motion testing of the J-2X engine, which is designed to power humans to Mars. NASA has selected the J-2X as the upper-stage propulsion for the evolved 143-ton (130-metric-ton) Space Launch System, an advanced heavy-lift launch vehicle.

Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne is a United Technologies Corp. company.

“This test series with the stub-nozzle extension was very successful,” said Walt Janowski , J-2X program manager, Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne. “We completed all the objectives we set out to accomplish, and acquired important information to help us better understand how the engine will perform during flight ñ from thrust, hardware durability and combustion stability. We look forward to continuing to work with NASA to provide a safe, reliable transportation system to explore new destinations in space.”

In the latest series of tests with the stub-nozzle extension, J-2X Engine 10002 was tested six times for a total of 2,156 seconds on the A-2 test stand at John C. Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. The stub-nozzle extension allows engineers to test the engine in near-vacuum conditions, similar to what it will experience in the extreme environment of space. The next step is to move the engine to the A-1 test stand, where it will be fired to test the range of gimbal motion for its flexible parts. Engine 10002 is the second J-2X development engine built by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne for NASA. The first J-2X engine, Engine 10001, was tested a total of 21 times for more than 45 minutes last year. The J-2X powerpack, which consists of components on top of the engine, was tested separately 13 times for a total of more than 100 minutes at Stennis Space Center.
The engines and powerpack were fired at varying pressures, temperatures and flow rates to ensure the engine is ready to support exploration beyond low-Earth orbit, Mars and beyond.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
U.S. Chamber of Commerce photograph

Boeing, Embraer to collaborate on ecoDemonstrator technology tests

U.S. Chamber of Commerce photograph Frederico Curado, president & CEO of Embraer, and Marc Allen, president of Boeing International, at the Brazil-U.S. Business Summit in Washington, D.C. The event occurred during an offici...
 
 
LM-Legion

Lockheed Martin’s Legion Pod™ takes to skies

Lockheed Martin photograph by Randy Crites Lockheed Martin’s Legion Pod recently completed its first flight test, successfully tracking multiple airborne targets while flying on an F-16 in Fort Worth, Texas. Legion Pod was in...
 
 

Raytheon wins U.S. Army contract award

Will provide R&D for ground vehicles, ground robotics The U.S. Army Contracting Command ñ Warren recently awarded Raytheon the TACOM Strategic Service Solutions indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract. The five-year multiple-award vehicle has a ceiling value of $634 million. The agreement covers future work on sensors, fire control systems, active protection systems, and robotics...
 

 

Lockheed Martin’s EW pod delivers proven ability to protect, control electromagnetic spectrum

Lockheed Martin is testing an electronic warfare pod in the company’s advanced anechoic chamber. The pod is designed to fit a variety of platforms, and is a self-contained electronic warfare package, encompassing an entire suite of capabilities in one unit.  Electronic warfare is the art and science of controlling the electromagnetic spectrum—from jamming enemy communications...
 
 
Northrop Grumman photograph

Northrop, Navy successfully conduct E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aerial refueling CDR

Northrop Grumman photograph An E-2C test aircraft assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 20 conducts an aerial refueling dry-plug engagement with an F/A-18. Northrop Grumman along with the U.S. Navy have successfully...
 
 

Northrop, Navy celebrate legacy of EA-6B Prowler

Northrop Grumman photograph by Edgar Mills The U.S. Navy’s last operational EA-6B Prowler, designed and built by Northrop Grumman, lifts off from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash. in a ceremonial fly-away June 27 from its long time operational base. The Navy is retiring the Prowler after nearly 45 years of service.   The U.S....
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>