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April 26, 2013

News Briefs April 26, 2013

U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,071

As of April 23, 2013, at least 2,071 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count.

At least 1,717 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result of hostile action, according to the military’s numbers.

Outside of Afghanistan, the department reports at least 119 more members of the U.S. military died in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Of those, 11 were the result of hostile action.

The AP count of total OEF casualties outside of Afghanistan is four more than the department’s tally.

The Defense Department also counts three military civilian deaths.

Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 18,418 U.S. service members have been wounded in hostile action, according to the Defense Department. AP

Army warns of steeper reductions in troop numbers

Senior Army officials are warning they may have to cut as many as 100,000 more soldiers over the next decade unless the automatic spending reductions forcing the military services to slash their budgets are stopped.

Army Secretary John McHugh tells a Senate committee April 23 the losses would undermine the service’s ability to be prepared for wartime missions. He says the Army is already planning to trim its ranks by 80,000 active duty troops due to previously planned budget reductions approved by Congress in 2011.

But if the automatic cuts, known as sequestration, continue into future years, thousands more soldiers, including reservists, will have to be let go due to a lack of money, McHugh says.

The Army’s share of the automatic cuts over the next six month is $7.6 billion. AP

Boeing aims for mid-May restart of 787 deliveries

Boeing says it will begin delivering 787s again in early May.

The 787 has been grounded since mid-January because of smoldering batteries. Federal authorities have approved Boeing’s redesigned battery system.

Boeing CEO Jim McNerney says the new battery setup has been installed on 10 787s that belong to airlines, and on nine more that have been built but not delivered.

He says “the bulk” of airline-owned 787s will get the battery fix by mid-May. Each installation takes about five days.

Boeing has kept producing the 787 even though it was grounded. But it can only collect the cash from airlines when it delivers the planes – so restarting deliveries is important to the company. AP




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