Tech

May 1, 2013

NASA selects U.S. small business technology transfer projects for further development

NASA has selected 14 proposals from small business and research institution teams to continue development of innovative technologies that are needed for future NASA missions and could become viable commercial products and services.

The Phase II selectees in NASA’s Small Business Technology Transfer Program may enter negotiations for possible contract awards, worth a combined total of approximately $9.8 million. High-tech firms in seven states submitted proposals in partnership with research institutions in nine states.

“As teams in our Small Business Technology Transfer Program move into their second phase of development, we’ll see innovative concepts mature into viable technologies that can be incorporated into NASA’s exploration plans and benefit our technology based economy,” said Michael Gazarik, NASA’s associate administrator for space technology in Washington. “Through modest investments in technology development among American small business and research institution teams, we’re planting the seed corn that will keep NASA leading the way forward in space exploration, and America leading the world in high-tech business enterprises.”

Technologies selected for further development under Phase II will demonstrate the feasibility of new propellants for in-space propulsion, increased capabilities to perform autonomous robotic operations and in-situ robotic planetary analysis, and new methods for the manufacturing of advanced alloys.

The STTR Program uses a highly competitive, three-phase award system that provides collaborative opportunities between qualified small businesses, including women-owned and disadvantaged firms, and research institutions to address specific technology gaps in NASA’s programs. Selected projects provide a foundation for future technology developments and are complementary to other NASA research investments.

Firms and research institutions that participated in Phase I of the STTR program submitted 38 Phase II proposals. Selection criteria included technical merit and innovation, Phase I results, value to NASA, commercial potential and company capabilities.

Phase I is a feasibility study to evaluate the scientific and technical merit of an idea. Phase II will expand on the results of last year’s projects, with as much as $700,000 to support research for as long as two more years. Phase III is for the commercialization of the results of Phase II and requires private sector or non-STTR federal funding.

NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., manages the STTR Program with executive oversight by the Space Technology Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA’s field installations manage individual projects.

For a complete list of selected companies, visit http://sbir.nasa.gov.

NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate is innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in NASA’s future missions.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
KMel Robotics photograph

Researchers test insect-inspired robots

KMel Robotics photograph These nano-quads are the size that the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Micro-Autonomous Systems Technology consortium of researchers envision. The current state is about as compact as a microwave oven. &n...
 
 
NASA photograph

NASA teams with South Korean agency to further improve air traffic management

NASA photograph Jaiwon Shin, NASAís associate administrator for Aeronautics Research, and Jaeboong Lee, president of the Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement, signed an agreement Nov. 17, 2014 in Seoul, South...
 
 

Air Force funds research on thermal management technology for fighter aircraft

Managing heat that is generated by electronic subsystems in next-generation aircraft is a vexing challenge for aerospace system designers. In the interest of meeting this challenge, the Air Force recently provided follow-on funding for a Small Business Innovation Research effort that is identifying improved methods for heat conduction and rejection from system electronics for advanced...
 

 

Report: Major federal lab misused contract funds

Managers at one of the nation’s premier federal laboratories improperly used taxpayer funds to influence members of Congress and other officials as part of an effort to extend the lab’s $2.4 billion management contract, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Inspector General said in a report Nov. 12. A review of documents determined that...
 
 

Teams announced for NASA 2015 robotics operations competition

Eight universities have advanced to the next round of “RASC-AL Robo-Ops,” a planetary rover robotics engineering competition sponsored by NASA and organized by the National Institute of Aerospace. The teams selected are California State University Long Beach, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge; San Jose State University in California; University of Buffalo in New York;...
 
 
NASA photograph by Ken Ulbrich

NASA tests revolutionary shape changing aircraft flap for first time

NASA photograph by Ken Ulbrich For taxi testing Oct. 31, 2014, at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge flap was extended to 20 degrees deflection. Fli...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>