Defense

May 6, 2013

C-130 squadron first to perform new airdrop method

A C-130J Hercules sits on the flightline as crews work to prepare the aircraft for an airdrop mission April 29, 2013, at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. The airdrop mission was the first use of Extracted Container Delivery System in Afghanistan, a new, more accurate, method of airdrop designed to pull the bundles out of the aircraft faster.

The 772nd Expeditionary Airlift Squadron executed the first combat Extracted Container Delivery System, or XCDS, airdrop April 29, successfully demonstrating the increased accuracy that this new technology provides.

The new airdrop method is designed to pull the bundles out of the aircraft at a faster rate than the current airdrop process, which improves the overall accuracy of the drop itself.

“Normally a bundle falls out of the aircraft due to gravity, with the speed mostly dependent on the deck angle of the aircraft,” said Capt. Raeanna Elms, with the 772nd EAS. “With XCDS, there is an additional parachute attached to a group of bundles, that pulls them out of the aircraft together and at a faster speed, resulting in a smaller dispersion area on the ground.”

For the loadmasters working with the CDS bundles, the new method adds more complexity to the rigging inside the aircraft, said Senior Airman Marisa Powers, a loadmaster with the 772nd EAS.

Because of the added complexity, Powers and her fellow loadmaster on the mission were very thorough in their preparations.

“We needed to seriously hit the books more than usual, get in there and read everything a million times and understand,” said Powers, who is a Coventry, R.I., native and deployed from the 143rd Airlift Wing of the Rhode Island National Guard. “My partner and I felt like we did a great job, sitting there for a solid two hours and highlighting, saying ‘This is what I feel like is important and we’ll go over it again tonight.'”

Crews with the 772nd EAS received some XCDS training back at home station before deploying. For Powers, the training included one flight back in the states, plus ground qualification. They came qualified, but the new procedures still had a learning curve.

Airmen prepare a C-130J Hercules for an airdrop mission April 2, 2013, at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. The airdrop mission was the first use of Extracted Container Delivery System in Afghanistan, a new, more accurate, method of airdrop designed to pull the bundles out of the aircraft faster than a normal airdrop, while resulting in a smaller dispersion of bundles in the drop zone.

“It was definitely a little more complicated of a drop,” Powers said. “Because it was the first time in theater we obviously didn’t want to mess it up, but we went line by line, sentence by sentence to double, triple check that every tie was made right, that every knot was in place.”

In the end, it’s the mission the crews look toward, she said.

“It’s the safety of the guys on the other end receiving it,” Powers said. “It’s all about helping the guys downrange.”

Seeing the bundles pulled out of the back of the aircraft, rather than trickling out as usual, was an unsual sight, Powers said.  After the bundles had landed, however, the accuracy of the XCDS drop was proven – the dispersion of the bundles on the drop zone was about two-thirds smaller, highlighting the value of the XCDS method in having the best placement for the soldiers.

“Our goal is to get the people on the ground what they need, where they want it,” said Elms, who is deployed from Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. “Plus, since we’re trying to build a positive relationship with the local people, we want a more accurate airdrop method that reduces the risk of a stray bundle damaging their homes and crops.”

 

MSgt. DeMond Connors (right) holds the measuring tape while A1C Justin McKenzie cuts a length of 550 cord to tie together bundles on a C-130J Hercules April 29, 2013. Both Airmen are with the 772nd Expeditionary Airlift Squadron and were securing the bundles as part of Extracted Container Delivery System, a new, more accurate, method of airdrop designed to pull the bundles out of the aircraft faster. Connors and McKenzie are both deployed from Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines July 31, 2015

News: Carter: Military leaders could arm more troops at home – Following the recent fatal shooting of four Marines and a sailor in Tennessee, Defense Secretary Ash Carter is ordering the military services to consider new policies that would enhance security for troops at home, including potentially arming more personnel.   Business: DOD weighs supplier base,...
 
 

News Briefs July 31, 2015

U.S. delivering eight newer F-16 warplanes to Egypt The United States Embassy in Cairo says the U.S. is delivering eight newer F-16 warplanes to Egypt as part of an ongoing military support package. It says in a July 30 statement that the aircraft, of the current Block 52 production variant, will be flown in from...
 
 
Lockheed Martin photograph

Lockheed Martin successfully tests design changes for Orion spacecraft’s fairing separation system

Lockheed Martin photograph A protective panel for Orion’s service module is jettisoned during testing at Lockheed Martin’s Sunnyvale, California facility. This test series evaluated design changes to the spacecraft’s fair...
 

 

Australian company to provide parts for initial production of Triton UAS

Northrop Grumman has awarded the first Australian supplier contract for the U.S. Navy’s MQ-4C Triton unmanned aircraft system initial production lot to Ferra Engineering. Brisbane-based Ferra Engineering will manufacture mechanical sub-assemblies for the first four Triton air vehicles including structural components. “At Northrop Grumman it’s very important to not only develop...
 
 
Boeing photograph

CH-46 ‘Phrog’ makes its last hop

Boeing photograph The CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter commonly known as the “Phrog,” is set to retire and to be flown one last time by Reserve Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron (HMM) 774 on Aug. 1. The CH-46 Sea Knight is a med...
 
 

Insitu awarded LRIP Lot IV RQ-21A Blackjack Systems contract

Under the terms of its latest contract, Insitu will build six RQ-21A Blackjack systems for the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The $78-million Small Tactical Unmanned Aircraft Systems Lot IV Low Rate Initial Production contract is the latest event in the program’s progression toward the Initial Operational Test and Evaluation phase.   “This award will...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>