Space

May 10, 2013

Boeing to build four more Intelsat Epic 702MP satellites

boeing-satellite
EL SEGUNDO, Calif. – Boeing will build four more 702MP satellites for Intelsat S.A., furthering its role as the initial manufacturer of Intelsatís new high-performance satellite fleet, Intelsat EpicNG.

The 702MPs will deliver reliable, affordable and high-capacity data transmission that Intelsat customers can tailor to their needs.

“Intelsat became our first customer for the 702MP in 2009, and we are thrilled that our satellite will carry the Intelsat EpicNG high-throughput platform,” said Craig Cooning, vice president and general manager of Boeing Space & Intelligence Systems. “We are committed to providing the same level of quality, on-time performance with this new order that we achieved with our prior Intelsat deliveries.”

The first EpicNG satellite, Intelsat 29e, was the fourth spacecraft and the last one still in production from Intelsat’s previous order. It is on track for launch in 2015 and will serve the Americas and the North Atlantic. The new contract adds four more EpicNG satellites to the Intelsat fleet, starting with Intelsat 33e to be launched in 2016.

“Through the use of exclusive Boeing technology, our forward-thinking EpicNG design allows us to offer a highly differentiated service for our customers, enabling them to establish their network architecture for the next decade,” said Dave McGlade, Intelsat chairman and chief executive officer. “Today’s agreement will allow us to implement further our global vision for the EpicNG fleet, delivering the most efficient satellite solutions over an open architecture, backward compatible platform for a range of fixed and mobile mission-critical customer applications. We are pleased to rely on Boeing for this next phase of our collaboration.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Northrop Grumman’s AstroMesh reflector successfully deploys for NASA’s SMAP satellite

The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory successfully deployed the mesh reflector and boom aboard the Soil Moisture Active Passive spacecraft, a key milestone on its mission to provide global measurements of soil moisture. Launched Jan. 31, SMAP represents the future of Earth Science by helping researchers better understand our planet. SMAP’s unmatched data capabilities are enabled...
 
 
NASA photograph by Brian Tietz

NASA offers space tech grants to early career university faculty

NASA photograph by Brian Tietz Tensegrity research is able to simulate multiple forms of locomotion. In this image, a prototype tensegrity robot reproduces forward crawling motion. NASA’s Space Technology Mission Director...
 
 

NASA releases first global rainfall, snowfall map from new mission

Like a lead violin tuning an orchestra, the GPM Core Observatory – launched one year ago on Feb. 27, 2014, as a collaboration between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency – acts as the standard to unify precipitation measurements from a network of 12 satellites. The result is NASA’s Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM...
 

 

New NASA Earth Science Missions expand view of our home planet

Four new NASA Earth-observing missions are collecting data from space with a fifth newly in orbit ñ after the busiest year of NASA Earth science launches in more than a decade. On Feb. 27, 2014, NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency launched the Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory into space from Japan. Data from...
 
 

NASA, ESA telescopes give shape to furious black hole winds

NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and ESA’s (European Space Agency) XMM-Newton telescope are showing that fierce winds from a supermassive black hole blow outward in all directions – a phenomenon that had been suspected, but difficult to prove until now. This discovery has given astronomers their first opportunity to measure the strength of these...
 
 
NASA photograph by Gary Banziger

Jurczyk named head of NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate

NASA photograph by Gary Banziger NASA’s Steve Jurczyck addresses an audience during a manufacturing event in Hampton, Va., last month. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden has named Steve Jurczyk as the agency’s Associ...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>