Defense

May 24, 2013

F-35 ITF works towards night, weather certification

Tags:
Laura Mowry
Staff Writer

The F-35 Integrated Test Force is completing a series of night flights, testing the ability to fly the jet safely in instrument meteorological conditions where the pilot has no external visibility references. The ITF, which has the lead on all F-35 mission systems testing, is responsible for five of the six night flights.

The F-35 Integrated Test Force is wrapping up a series of night flights, which are testing the aircraft’s capability when flying in instrument meteorological conditions.

It is a necessary step in delivering a core competency to the warfighter – the ability to fly the jet safely when there are no external visibility references for the pilot.

“This will increase the combat capability eventually. But, in the interim, it will increase the training capacity. The capability to fly at night and in the weather is one of the core competencies that must be delivered to the warfighter,” said Lt. Col. Peter Vitt, F-35 ITF director of operations. “This is about safety, specification compliance and predicting operational utility; it’s our job to find out how well the system works, how well our pilots interact with the displays and how the navigational system works.”

The ITF, which has the lead on all F-35 mission systems testing, is responsible for five night flights, with Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., conducting the sixth.

“The original intent was to spread the night flights around, three would be conducted here and three at Pax River with B and C variants,” said Vitt. “But, as we moved into the execution phase, it made sense for us to do five here because of the variety in our pilots’ backgrounds.

Additionally, the airplanes fly essentially the same in an instrument environment and the mission system software is identical, so we leveraged that to make things more efficient.”

For safety purposes and to ensure decision-quality data is collected, the ITF used a build-up approach to conduct the night flights. Pilots began with flying in visual meteorological conditions, familiarizing themselves with the F-35’s mission systems.

Simulator flights, which occurred in February, also helped pilots prepare for the missions.

“Progress towards IMC certification has been ongoing for a few years. We have been flying under good conditions during the day, using the same displays intended to support IMC flight. Recently we performed a series of simulator tests under instrument conditions. The final step was actual night test missions without reference to a visible horizon,” said Maj. Eric Schultz, F-35 test pilot.
JSF2
“We’re just finishing up those flights. The simulator does not exactly replicate actual flight conditions, so we flew to make sure the F-35 provides the displays, communications and other systems you need to safely fly at night or in weather when you’re lacking the view of the outside world,” he added.

When the ITF completes the night flights, a variety of capabilities will have been tested including ground operations and the pilot’s ability to maneuver the aircraft without becoming disoriented. The test team will also evaluate the navigation systems, data from the instrument landing system, and how well the radios work.

Just as important is the pilot’s assessment, evaluating whether or not they are getting the necessary information and can adequately use it to make informed decisions.

From ground operations to landing and taxiing the aircraft, each mission is packed with test points, so the test team gets the most out of each flight.

“We evaluated ground operations and takeoff, followed by flying to a desired location with no external references. Once you’re where you need to be, the pilot performed a series of maneuvers to make sure climbs, turns and descents can be performed with precision without getting disoriented,” said Schultz. “Then transit home, complete an instrument approach to landing and taxi the aircraft back to parking. We have test points for all of that.”

Conducting instrument meteorological conditions testing proved to be somewhat of a challenge and required some ingenuity to make sure pilots had no external visual references, while avoiding weather conditions the aircraft is not yet cleared to fly in.

“There are certain weather conditions we haven’t tested yet, so we can’t fly there yet. We had to find a way to fly instrument conditions without flying in certain kinds of weather. The creative solution the team came up with was to fly over the water and remote areas over land where there isn’t cultural lighting to provide a horizon for the pilot,” said Vitt.

“This is just another example of what happens here all the time, the ITF finds a way to accomplish the testing and get the data we need to overcome the various hurdles we see every day.”

While still in the early development phase, the ITF has used the night flights as an opportunity to identify areas of improvement for the mission systems to better serve the warfighter. As the ITF successfully wraps up the night flights, the team’s input will ultimately result in a safer, more capable weapon system.

This is not the first series of night flights for the F-35 ITF. In December 2011, a flight test only clearance was granted, so the test team could get an early look at the aircraft’s refueling lights and assess night air refueling capabilities. Nighttime aerial refueling took place for the first time in early 2012, demonstrating the F-35’s ability to safely and adequately perform the task.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines November 24, 2014

News: Hagel said to be stepping down as defense chief under pressure - Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is stepping down under pressure, the first cabinet-level casualty of President Obama’s Democratic majority in the Senate and a beleaguered national security team that has struggled to stay ahead of an onslaught of global crises. Afghan mission for U.S....
 
 

News Briefs November 24, 2014

Fog forces five U.S. choppers to land in Polish field Officials say that that fog forced five U.S. Army helicopters to make an emergency landing in a Polish field and spend the night there, the second such incident since September. The U.S. Army said 15 soldiers were moving equipment to their base in Germany Nov....
 
 
Air Force photograph by Samuel King Jr.

Navy’s first F-35C squadron surpasses 1,000 flight hours

Air Force photograph by Samuel King Jr. An F-35C Lightning II aircraft piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Chris Tabert, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101, flies the squadron’s first local sortie. The F-35C is the carrier va...
 

 
boeing-SC-787

Boeing South Carolina begins final assembly of its first 787-9 Dreamliner

Boeing has started final assembly of the 787-9 Dreamliner at its South Carolina facility. The team began joining large fuselage sections of the newest 787 Nov. 22 on schedule, a proud milestone for the South Carolina team and a...
 
 
Lockheed Martin image

Ball Aerospace equips Orion mission with key avionics, antenna hardware

Lockheed Martin image Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. is providing the phased array antennas and flight test cameras to prime contractor Lockheed Martin for Orion’s Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1), which is an u...
 
 

Salina, Kansas, recalls anniversary of shuttered base

It has been 50 years this month since the announcement that Schilling Air Force Base was closing rattled Salina residents. The Salina Journal, which carried news of the closure in its Nov. 19, 1964, editions, reported that the economic disaster then spared no part of the community – real estate, retail, civic involvement, church attendance,...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>