Space

June 19, 2013

NASA announces asteroid grand challenge

NASA announced June 18 a Grand Challenge focused on finding all asteroid threats to human populations and knowing what to do about them.

The challenge, which was announced at an asteroid initiative industry and partner day at NASA Headquarters in Washington, is a large-scale effort that will use multi-disciplinary collaborations and a variety of partnerships with other government agencies, international partners, industry, academia and citizen scientists. It complements NASA’s recently announced mission to redirect an asteroid and send humans to study it.

“NASA already is working to find asteroids that might be a threat to our planet, and while we have found 95 percent of the large asteroids near the Earth’s orbit, we need to find all those that might be a threat to Earth,” said NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver. “This Grand Challenge is focused on detecting and characterizing asteroids and learning how to deal with potential threats. We will also harness public engagement, open innovation and citizen science to help solve this global problem.”

Grand Challenges are ambitious goals on a national or global scale that capture the imagination and demand advances in innovation and breakthroughs in science and technology. They are an important element of President Obama’s Strategy for American Innovation.

“I applaud NASA for issuing this Grand Challenge because finding asteroid threats, and having a plan for dealing with them, needs to be an all-hands-on-deck effort,” said Tom Kalil, deputy director for technology and innovation at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. “The efforts of private-sector partners and our citizen scientists will augment the work NASA already is doing to improve near-Earth object detection capabilities.”

NASA also released a request for information that invites industry and potential partners to offer ideas on accomplishing NASA’s goal to locate, redirect, and explore an asteroid, as well as find and plan for asteroid threats. The RFI is open for 30 days, and responses will be used to help develop public engagement opportunities and a September industry workshop.

For more information about NASA’s asteroid initiative, including presentations from Tuesday’s event and a link to the new RFI, visit http://www.nasa.gov/asteroidinitiative.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

News Briefs July 6, 2015

Russian MiG fighter crashes in southern Russia, pilot lives The Russian Defense Ministry says a Russian air force fighter jet has crashed in the south but its pilot ejected safely. The MiG-29 fighter jet went down July 3 near the village of Kushchevskaya in the Krasnodar region, 620 miles south of Moscow. The ministry said...
 
 
Army photograph by Doug LaFon

Army researcher’s interest in robotics leads to innovative device

Army photograph by Doug LaFon Dan Baechle, left, from the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Multifunctional Materials research team, has created a laboratory prototype of a device he designed to sense and damp out arm tremors for A...
 
 
Air Force photograph by TSgt. Joseph Swafford

Pave Hawk maintainers keep rescue birds flying

Air Force photograph by TSgt. Joseph Swafford Airman Joshua Herron, a 41st Expeditionary Helicopter Maintenance Unit HH-60 Pave Hawk crew chief, completes a 50-hour inspection on a Pave Hawk at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Jun...
 

 
Air Force photograph by SrA. Benjamin Raughton

B-52s demonstrate strategic reach

Air Force photograph by SrA. Benjamin Raughton A B-52H Stratofortress is marshalled to a stop at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., after a 44-hour sortie July 2, 2015. Aircrew members and two B-52s from Barksdale AFB’s 96th ...
 
 

Soldier missing from Korean War accounted for

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced July 1 that the remains of a serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors. Army Sgt. Joseph M. Snock Jr. of Apollo, Pennsylvania, was buried July 6, in Arlington National Cemetery. In...
 
 

NASA awards Raytheon $240 million contract for earth science data system

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center has awarded the Raytheon a five year contract valued at up to $240 million to continue its support of the Earth Observing Systems Data and Information System. This system ingests, archives and makes earth science data available to the scientific community worldwide. The latest EOSDIS Evolution and Development contract is...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>