Business

July 8, 2013

Aerojet Rocketdyne welcomes senior vice president

Aerojet Rocketdyne announced July 8 that Paul Meyer will join the company as senior vice president, Advanced Programs & Business Development.

This newly-created organization encompasses Advanced Programs, Advanced Technology and Business Development for all of Aerojet Rocketdyne.

In his role, Meyer will serve as a key partner to the president, responsible for leading the continued growth, diversification and transformation of the Aerojet Rocketdyne enterprise, which currently encompasses more than 5,300 employees at 16 sites across the United States and throughout the world.
Meyer will provide a renewed focus on Strategy, Business Development and Washington Operations, and on nurturing key customer and supplier relationships. Meyer and his team will be responsible for filling a robust pipeline for all business units through focused pursuits and captures in Space and Defense Advanced Programs to achieve Aerojet Rocketdyne’s goals for growth. In his role as senior vice president, Meyer also will fulfill certain delegated responsibilities as a deputy to the president.

“Paul brings an unparalleled level of expertise in capturing new business through the development of new products and capabilities that meet the evolving needs of customers,” said Warren M. Boley, Jr., Aerojet Rocketdyne president. “He will be a tremendous asset to our executive leadership team and I’m thrilled to have him on board. Paul’s strategic mindset and demonstrated track record in leveraging advanced development programs fit in nicely with the vision we have outlined for Aerojet Rocketdyne.”

Meyer has been extensively involved in the aerospace industry since 1988. Meyer retired after 13 years at Northrop Grumman, most recently as sector vice president and general manager of the Aerospace Systems Advanced Programs and Technology Division. During his leadership, the company achieved the launch, first flight, and capture of more than 15 new air and space advanced designs, including two key commercial space ventures – one for Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic, and the other for Paul Allen’s Stratolaunch under Scaled Composites, a Burt Rutan-founded company, integrated within his division. Prior to joining Northrop Grumman, Meyer also served in a variety of program management and business development roles at Lockheed Martin’s Skunk Works.

Meyer holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of Missouri, Columbia. He also is a graduate of the University of Southern California’s Executive Management Development Program as well as a graduate of Stanford University’s Senior Executive Development Program.

Commissioned in the United States Air Force through the University, Meyer graduated from the Air Force’s Electronic Warfare Officer School, Fighter Weapons Instructor Course and Nuclear Weapons Instructor Course. Meyer completed 23 years of service in 2000, serving in a variety of leadership roles during both active duty and the Air National Guard.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines November 26, 2014

News: When Hagel leaves, new SecDef faces big questions about the military’s futureĀ - President Obama’s new pick to run the Pentagon will face a dizzying set of challenges affecting the Defense Department’s mission, budget and culture. Who will be the next Secretary of Defense?- Following the Nov. 24 surprise announcement from the White House, the...
 
 

News Briefs November 26, 2014

Navy to decommission two more ships in Puget Sound The Navy recently decommissioned the guided missile frigate USS Ingraham at Everett, Wash. It will be towed to Bremerton and scrapped. The Daily Herald reports the Navy also plans to decommission another ship at the Everett homeport and also one stationed in Bremerton. Naval Station Everett...
 
 

NASA airborne campaigns tackle climate questions from Africa to Arctic

NASA photograph The DC-8 airborne laboratory is one of several NASA aircraft that will fly in support of five new investigations into how different aspects of the interconnected Earth system influence climate change. NASA photograph The DC-8 airborne laboratory is one of several NASA aircraft that will fly in support of five new investigations into...
 

 
Air Force photograph by Rick Goodfriend

16T Pitch Boom reactivated to support wind tunnel tests

Air Force photograph by Rick Goodfriend The Pitch Boom at the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel (16T) was recently reactivated. This model support system is used in conjunction with a roll mechanism to provide a combined pitch...
 
 

Northrop Grumman supports U.S. Air Force Minuteman missile test launch

Northrop Grumman recently supported the successful flight testing of the U.S. Air Force’s Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile weapon system. The operational flight test was conducted as part of the Air Force Global Strike Command’s Force Development Evaluation Program. This program demonstrates and supports assessment of the accuracy, availability and reliability of the...
 
 
army-detector

Scientists turn handheld JCAD into a dual-use chemical, explosives detector

Scientists at the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., proved it is possible to teach an old dog new tricks by adding the ability to detect explosive materials to the Joint Chemical Age...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>