Business

July 8, 2013

Northrop Grumman moves new B-2 satellite communications concept to high ground

In a May 2013 demonstration, Northrop Grumman proved that a new active electronically scanned array antenna it developed for the B-2 bomber can establish and maintain communications services with an on-orbit Air Force Advanced EHF communications satellite. In the photo, two Northrop Grumman engineers measure the RF power levels of the transmit array of the new antenna prior to conducting the demo with the satellite.

REDONDO BEACH, Calif. – Northrop Grumman has taken another significant step to reduce the risks and costs associated with producing an extremely high frequency satellite communications system for the U.S. Air Force’s B-2 stealth bomber.

In a demonstration conducted May 23, Northrop Grumman proved that a new active electronically scanned array antenna it has developed for the B-2 can establish and maintain communications services with an on-orbit Air Force Advanced EHF communications satellite. The demo included the antenna, a Navy Multi-band Terminal and the satellite.

Northrop Grumman is the Air Force’s prime contractor for the B-2, the flagship of the nation’s long range strike arsenal, and one of the world’s most survivable aircraft.  An EHF satellite communications system would allow the B-2 to send and receive battlefield information significantly faster than its current satellite communications system.

“Our demo marks the first time that AESA antenna technology has been used to communicate with the AEHF network,” said Byron Chong, Northrop Grumman’s B-2 deputy program manager. “We showed that our antenna will consistently produce and maintain the high-gain beam needed to communicate with AEHF satellites.”

During the test, he added, Northrop Grumman successfully demonstrated extended data rate (XDR) communications between the AESA antenna and the AEHF satellite at EHF frequencies. XDR communications take advantage of the AEHF satellites’ most advanced, most secure signaling protocols and communication waveforms.

In a May 2013 demonstration, Northrop Grumman proved that a new active electronically scanned array antenna it developed for the B-2 bomber can establish and maintain communications services with an on-orbit Air Force Advanced EHF communications satellite. In the photo, two Northrop Grumman engineers measure the RF power levels of the transmit array of the new antenna prior to conducting the demo with the satellite.

The new antenna is designed to support both tactical and strategic missions. Its innovative “no radome” design allows it to bring new communications capabilities to the B-2 while maintaining the aircraft’s major operational characteristics.

Earlier this year, Northrop Grumman validated the performance of the new antenna on instrumented test ranges. The tests verified the antenna’s performance over its entire transmit and receive frequency band, and over its required range of scan angles.

The B-2 is the only long-range, large-payload U.S. aircraft that can penetrate deeply into access-denied airspace, and the only combat-proven stealth platform in the current U.S. inventory. In concert with the Air Force’s air superiority fleet, which provides airspace control, and the Air Force’s tanker fleet, which enables global mobility, the B-2 can help protect U.S. interests anywhere in the world. It can fly more than 6,000 nautical miles unrefueled and more than 10,000 nautical miles with just one aerial refueling, giving it the ability to reach any point on the globe within hours.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines March 30, 2015

News: Pentagon chief mulls easing military enlistment standards - Defense Secretary Ash Carter is considering easing some military enlistment standards as part of a broader set of initiatives to better attract and keep quality service members and civilians across the Defense Department.   Business: Lockheed pays $2 million to settle government overbilling charges - Lockheed Martin Corpor...
 
 

News Briefs March 30, 2015

Landing mishap for military chopper; two aboard unhurt Two Navy officers were unhurt after their helicopter rolled on its side while landing in the Florida Panhandle. The mishap happened the night of March 27 at a Navy landing site in Pensacola, Fla. The Pensacola News Journal reports a pilot instructor and a student were able...
 
 
Air Force photograph by TSgt. Matt Hecht

Laser-based aircraft countermeasure provides ‘unlimited rounds’ against MANPADS

Air Force photograph by TSgt. Matt Hecht A U.S. Army AH-64 Apache attack helicopter prepares to depart Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, on Jan 7, 2012. The Apache conducts distributed operations, precision strikes against relocat...
 

 

Navy, Air Force advocate for modernizing combat aviation

Top Navy and Air Force officials today told the House Armed Services subcommittee on tactical air and land forces the president’s budget request for fiscal year 2016 will support modernizing combat aviation programs. Cavy Vice Adm. Paul A. Grosklags, principal military deputy to the assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development and acquisitions; Air...
 
 

Raytheon wins $46 million contract for South Korean Global Hawk ground stations

Raytheon has been awarded a contract valued at up to $45.7 million by Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems for ground segments in support of four Global Hawk unmanned aircraft systems recently purchased by the Republic of Korea. Under this contract, Raytheon will deliver one building-based and one mobile ground segment to locations in South Korea. Work...
 
 
Air Force photograph by SrA. Victor J. Caputo

McConnell community marks B-29 rollout

Air Force photograph by SrA. Victor J. Caputo A B-29 Superfortress aircraft, named Doc after its nose art, sit on the flightline March 23, 2015, in Wichita, Kan. Doc will be one of two Superfortresses in the world capable of fl...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>