Defense

July 15, 2013

B-1 test squadron demonstrates anti-ship missile

Tags:
SrA. Charles V. Rivezzo
Dyess AFB, Texas

Airmen from the 7th Munitions Squadron transport a Long Range Anti-Ship Missile toward a B-1 Bomber June 12, 2013, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The weapon loading was part of a trial-run for munitions Airmen prior to the first captive carry test conducted by the 337th Test and Evaluation Squadron June 17.

The 337th Test and Evaluation Squadron at Dyess Air Force Base ,Texas, successfully completed their first captive carry test of a Long Range Anti-Ship Missile on-board a B-1 Bomber June 17, marking a significant step forward toward the B-1s role in the maritime environment.

Designed and developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the Office of Naval Research, the LRASM is based off the Joint Air to Surface Standoff Missile Extended Range and was constructed as part of an effort to overcome challenges faced by current anti-ship missiles penetrating sophisticated enemy air defense systems.

“This is a big stepping stone toward fielding an anti-surface warfare cruise missile,” said Maj. Shane Garner, 337th TES. “However, at the end of this program, this particular missile is not going to be a fielded weapon; it’s what we call a technology demonstrator. The point of this program isn’t to field a missile, but to demonstrate the new technologies they want to put into an anti-surface warfare JASSM variant.”

Because the LRASM leverages the state-of-the-art JASSM-ER airframe, it proved to be a seamless transition for the B-1 in terms of compatibility, significantly reducing the time and costs associated with traditional weapons testing.

MSgt. Troy Drasher, 7th Maintenance Group, inspects a Long Range Anti-Ship Missile prior to being loaded onto a B-1 Bomber June 12, 2013, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The LRASM is based on the Joint Air to Surface Standoff Missile Extended Range, but incorporates a multi-mode radio frequency sensor, a new weapon datalink and altimeter and an uprated power system. However, it has a reduced range than the JASSM-ER, similar to that of the original JASSM.

“When the B-1 looks at this missile it just reads it as a JASSM-ER,” said Capt. Alicia Datzman, 337th TES. “In turn, DARPA was able to exploit that capability and simply add on the new technology to expedite the cost. Currently, JASSM officials are doing everything they can to take this missile’s technology and move it into a program that would eventually become operational.”

However, while the LRASM does utilize the airframe of the JASSM-ER, it incorporates additional sensors and systems to achieve a stealthy and survivable subsonic cruise missile as well as a weapon data link and an enhanced digital anti-jam GPS to detect and destroy specific targets within a group of ships.

“One of the biggest improvements of this weapon is its ability to receive target or coordinate updates in-flight,” Garner said. “Unlike the JASSMs ‘fire and forget’ mentality, this new technology gives you the chance to ‘fire and change your mind.’ Because of the standoff feature these weapons possess, they tend to be in-flight for some time. For us to be able to change its coordinates on the fly provides us with a large range of flexibility.”

MSgt. Troy Drasher (left) and TSgt. Alfred Agee both from the 7th Maintenance Group load a Long Range Anti-Ship Missile into the bomb bay of a B-1 Bomber June 12, 2013, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. Unlike current anti-ship missiles the LRASM will be capable of conducting autonomous targeting, relying on on-board targeting systems to independently acquire the target without the presence of prior, precision intelligence, or supporting services like Global Positioning Satellite navigation and data-links. These capabilities will enable positive target identification, precision engagement of moving ships and establishing of initial target cueing in extremely hostile environment.

The overarching concept behind the B-1’s rise in the maritime environment can be attributed to the Department of Defense’s much discussed Air-Sea Battle concept, in which long range bombers serve as a key tenet.

ASB is designed to guide the four branches of the armed forces as they work together to maintain a continued U.S. advantage against the global proliferation of advanced military technologies and anti-access/area denial capabilities.

Furthermore, should the LRASM technology be fielded into a variant of the JASSM-ER, the B-1 presents itself as a premier platform to carry the weapon, as it is currently capable of carrying 24 of the long range missiles, tops across all Air Force platforms.

The 337th TES is scheduled to complete its first live-fire test of the missile in the coming months.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines January 23, 2015

News: Yemen chaos threatens U.S. counterterror efforts, including drone programĀ - The White House’s strategy for fighting al-Qaeda in Yemen – repeatedly presented as a model by President Obama – was left in tatters Thursday by the resignation of the man who personally approved U.S. drone strikes in the country and the collapse of its central...
 
 

News Briefs January 23, 2015

NATO detects key Russian military equipment in east Ukraine NATO’s top commander in Europe says the alliance has detected the presence of key Russian military equipment in eastern Ukraine that, in the past, has accompanied large inflows of Russian troops. Gen. Philip Breedlove told a news conference Jan. 22 in Brussels that Russian electronic warfare...
 
 
Boeing photograph

Boeing Maritime Surveillance Aircraft ready for demonstration flights

Boeing photograph The Boeing Maritime Surveillance Aircraft program is ready for customer demonstration flights, having completed the baseline ground and flight testing of the aircraft mission systems. The Boeing Maritime Surve...
 

 
Air Force photograph by Jacqueline Cowan

F135 test demonstrates success of AEDC workshare initiative

Air Force photograph by Jacqueline Cowan Aerospace Testing Alliance Test Engineer Darren Carroll, pictured in front, assists as Pratt & Whitney Test Engineer Ronnie Thomas does a borescope inspection of the fan on the F135 ...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald

40 years of Red Flag at Nellis

U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald A flight of F-15 Eagles and F-16 Fighting Falcons Aggressors fly in formation over the Nevada Test and Training Ranges June 5, 2008. The proposal for Red Flag came in early...
 
 
Lockheed Martin photograph

Navy gears up to order production of 29 aircraft diagnostic systems

Lockheed Martin photograph Petty Officers Third Class Ira Schwartz assigned to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla., left, and Devin Riley from Fleet Readiness Center Mid-Atlantic at Naval Ai...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>