Space

July 26, 2013

NASA astronauts demonstrate operations in Boeing CST-100 spacecraft

Astronaut Serena Aunon prepares to enter the CST-100 mockup for flight-suit evaluations.

 
Two NASA astronauts for the first time evaluated communications, ergonomics and crew-interface aspects of the Boeing Crew Space Transportation-100 capsule, showing how future astronauts will operate in the spacecraft as it transports them to the International Space Station and other low Earth orbit destinations.

Serena Aunon and Randy Bresnik, wearing their pressured flight suits, worked through the activities in Houston July 22, watched by NASA and Boeing officials as well as media. The capsule’s interior features tablet displays as well as multicolor LED lighting pioneered on Boeing commercial airplanes. What’s more, the capsule can be manufactured without welds, giving it greater structural integrity.

“We’re extremely pleased with the progress our commercial partners are making,” said Kathy Lueders, NASA Commercial Crew Program deputy manager. “We continually marvel at the ingenuity of our partners and are confident that we will have the ability to launch our astronauts from U.S. soil aboard American-made systems in a few years.”

“These demonstrations are an important step leading to our Critical Design Review this autumn, and we’re confident that we’re taking the right measures to provide a spacecraft that is safe, cost-efficient and innovative,” said John Mulholland, Boeing vice president and program manager, Commercial Programs.

The Boeing CST-100 and its launch system are being developed under a Space Act Agreement with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program during the agency’s Commercial Crew Integrated Capability (CCiCap) development phase.

 




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