Veterans

July 29, 2013

Post-9/11 GI Bill celebrates fourth anniversary

Aug. 1, marks the fourth anniversary of the Post-9/11 GI Bill.

The VA has issued approximately $30 billion in Post 9/11 GI-Bill benefit payments since its inception in August 2009 and helped nearly 1 million service members, veterans and their families pursue their education.

ìThe Post-9/11 GI Bill has helped many of our Nationís Veterans pursue their education and successfully transition to civilian life,î said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki. ìWeíre proud that the Department of Veterans Affairs can administer this important benefit that makes such a big difference in the lives of nearly a million veterans and their families.

The Post-9/11 GI Bill is the most extensive educational assistance program since the Servicemanís Readjustment Act of 1944, more commonly known as the GI Bill, was signed into law.

The Post-9/11 GI Bill provides comprehensive educational support through tuition, books and housing allowance to people with at least 90 days of total service after September 10, 2001, or people discharged with a service-connected disability after 30 days.

Approved training under the Post-9/11 GI Bill includes graduate and undergraduate degrees, vocational and technical training, on-the-job training, flight training, correspondence training, licensing and national testing programs, entrepreneurship training, and tutorial assistance.

The VA is now processing benefit payments for currently enrolled students in an average of seven days, largely as a result of VAís ongoing transformation to electronic claims processing.†The delivery of Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits has been automated and processing time cut in half through implementation of VAís Long Term Solution, an end-to-end claims processing system that uses rules-based, industry-standard technologies.

Since the end of World War II, GI Bill programs have shaped and changed the lives of veterans, service members their families and their survivors by helping them reach their educational and employment goals,î said Allison A. Hickey, Under Secretary for Benefits. ìThat is still true today.

In April 2012, President Obama signed Executive Order 13607 which established the Principles of Excellence, offering guidelines that promote student success under the program and ensure accurate information about institutions and their courses. Over 6,000 educational and training institutions have agreed to comply with these principles.

The Principles of Excellence, further strengthened by Public Law 112-249, provide future student Veterans with greater consumer educationî said Michael Dakduk, executive director of Student Veterans of America. ìIt is extremely important to have the right tools and information before making a decision on a post-secondary credential, degree program, or institution of higher learning.

This summer, VA is launching new tools to help beneficiaries learn more about their vocational aptitudes and select an education institution.

  • The Factors to Consider When Choosing a Schoolí guide offers future students steps to take when researching, choosing, and attending a school.
  • CareerScope is a free, new tool featured on http://www.gibill.va.gov that measures a studentís aptitude and interests through a self-administered online test, identifying potential career paths.
  • The new GI Bill Comparison Tool allows students to research and compare schools, including key indicators like average student loan debt and graduation rates.
  • We will continue to work hard to improve VAís benefits delivery process for Post-9/11 GI Bill beneficiaries and to ensure that Veterans and their families have the tools they need to choose the right education institution to help them build a foundation for the future, Hickey added.

For more information on the Post-9/11 GI Bill and other Veteran education programs, visit http://www.gibill.va.gov.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines September 2, 2014

News: Debris yields clues that pilot never ejected - When investigators were finally able to safely enter the crash site of an F-15C “Eagle” fighter jet on the afternoon of Aug. 27, they made a grim discovery that concluded more than 30 hours of searching – the pilot never managed to eject from the aircraft.  ...
 
 

News Briefs September 2, 2014

Pentagon: Iraq operations cost $560 million so far U.S. military operations in Iraq, including airstrikes and surveillance flights, have cost about $560 million since mid-June, the Pentagon said Aug. 29. Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Pentagon press secretary, said the average daily cost has been $7.5 million. He said it began at a much lower...
 
 

Unmanned aircraft partnership reaches major milestone

A team of research students and staff from Warsaw University of Technology have successfully demonstrated the first phase of flight test and integration of unmanned aircraft platforms with an autonomous mission control system. The demonstration marks a significant milestone in a partnership between the university and Lockheed Martin that began earlier this year. This is...
 

 

Raytheon delivers first Block 2 Rolling Airframe Missiles to US Navy

Raytheon delivered the first Block 2 variant of its Rolling Airframe Missile system to the U.S. Navy as part of the company’s 2012 Low Rate Initial Production contract. RAM Block 2 is a significant performance upgrade featuring enhanced kinematics, an evolved radio frequency receiver, and an improved control system. “As today’s threats continue to evolve,...
 
 
Courtesy photograph

Two Vietnam War Soldiers, one from Civil War to receive Medal of Honor

U.S. Army graphic Retired Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. Adkins and former Spc. 4 Donald P. Sloat will receive the Medal of Honor for actions in Vietnam. The White House announced Aug. 26 that Retired Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. A...
 
 

Sparks fly as NASA pushes limits of 3-D printing technology

NASA has successfully tested the most complex rocket engine parts ever designed by the agency and printed with additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, on a test stand at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. NASA engineers pushed the limits of technology by designing a rocket engine injector – a highly complex part that...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>