Space

July 31, 2013

NASA’s Marshall Center honors hundreds of team members for contributions

NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., July 30 honored more than 200 individual scientists, engineers and professional and administrative support personnel, plus 73 teams comprised of hundreds more, all of whom made significant, sustained contributions in 2012-13 to NASA’s mission and the work of the center.

Marshall Center Director Patrick Scheuermann welcomed award recipients and their guests, and introduced keynote speaker Christopher Scolese, director of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Scolese also joined Marshall Center leaders in presenting the awards.

NASA Distinguished Service Medals, the highest honor given by the agency to its civil service employees, were presented to Stephen F. Cash, director of Marshall’s Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate, and James F. Spann, supervisor of the Science and Research Office within Marshall’s Science and Technology Office. Distinguished Service Medals honor individuals whose personal contributions have profoundly aided NASA’s mission and the interests of the United States.

Receiving NASA Distinguished Public Service Medals, the highest honor the agency awards to non-government workers, were George Charles Adams of Jacobs Technology in Huntsville; Deborah E. Barnhart, executive director of the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville; Gary L. Enochs of KAYA Associates, Inc./Parsons in Huntsville; and Theodore L. Shaffner of Alliant Technologies Inc., headquartered in Morristown, N.J. Distinguished Public Service Medals are awarded to individuals whose personal acts of service, ability or vision have contributed to NASA’s advancement of national interests.

NASA Outstanding Leadership Medals, reflecting exceptional leadership of NASA technical or administrative programs, were presented to Lisa B. Bates, Vernotto C. McMillan, Chad A. Summers and John H. Vickers of Marshall’s Engineering Directorate; Thomas D. Byrd of the Space Launch System Program Office; Kenneth M. Criswell of the Office of Center Operations; Andrew S. Keys, Marshall Center chief technologist; Roy W. Malone, director of NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans; Todd A. May, director of the Space Launch System Program Office; and Rosalyn M. Patrick of the Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate.

James C. Banks, an employee of Wyle Laboratories of Huntsville supporting Marshall’s Office of Center Operations, received the NASA Outstanding Public Leadership Medal. The award honors non-government employees for noteworthy accomplishments significantly influencing NASA’s mission.

NASA Exceptional Service Medals, awarded to civil service employees for sustained performance and multiple contributions to NASA programs, projects or initiatives, were presented to Erika Alvarez, Tenina A. Bili, Matthew J. Casiano, Christopher J. Crump, Jeffrey T. Farmer, Gail H. Gordon, Jose M. Roman and John E. (Eric) Tepool of the Engineering Directorate; Richard J. Blakeslee, Karen H. Fowler and Melissa A. McGrath of the Science and Technology Office; Alan L. Clark and Timothy A. Hemken of the Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate; John M. Dumoulin, retired, of the Office of Strategic Analysis and Communications; Susan E. Gentile of the Office of Human Capital; Tarrie A. Hood and Richard M. Pearson of the Office of the Chief Information Officer; Kathy U. Jones and William C. Kahle of the Flight Programs and Partnerships Office; Alicia L. (Luanne) Kidd of the Space Launch System Program Office; Kevin L. Primm of the Office of Center Operations; and Tereasa H. Washington, director of the Office of Human Capital.

Receiving NASA Exceptional Public Service Medals were Juan S. Blanch and Ashley D. Hill of Dynamic Concepts Inc.; George H. Ritter of Computer Sciences Corp.; and Flint L. Wild of Dynetics Technical Services. All three firms are headquartered in Huntsville. These public service medals are presented to non-government employees for sustained performance and multiple contributions to NASA programs, projects or initiatives.

NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals, awarded to civil service employees for significant, special contributions to NASA’s mission, were presented to Michael D. Allen of the Space Launch System Program Office; Raymond E. Bradley and Philisha B. Stephens of the Office of Center Operations; Richard K. Burt and Edward F. Johnson of the Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate; Victoria N. Coffey, David S. McGhee and David C. Reynolds of the Engineering Directorate; Thomas W. Oliver of the Office of the Chief Information Officer; Samuel A. Ortega of the Science and Technology Office; Norman Frank Six of the Office of Human Capital; and James L. Reuter, senior executive for technology and integration in the Office of the Director.

Recipients of NASA Exceptional Public Achievement Medals, awarded for significant, special contributions to NASA’s mission by non-government team members, included David L. Chapman of KAYA Associates; Clay W. Fulcher of Jacobs Engineering; and Kenneth J. Miller of Jacobs Technology.

NASA Exceptional Engineering Achievement Medals, reflecting outstanding engineering accomplishments aiding NASA’s mission, were presented to Philip A. Allen, Samuel B. Fowler, David M. O’Dell and Jeffrey West of the Engineering Directorate; and Jeb S. Orr of Draper Laboratory in Cambridge, Mass., and David A. Zoller of Computer Sciences Corp., both supporting the Engineering Directorate.

NASA Exceptional Technology Achievement Medals, honoring new or advanced technological contributions supporting NASA’s mission, were presented to Donald O. Frazier, retired, of the Science and Technology Office; and Les Johnson of the Engineering Directorate.

Receiving NASA Exceptional Administrative Achievement Medals — reflecting significant achievements or contributions by civil service or non-government clerical or administrative assistants — were Esther A. Jefferson of the Engineering Directorate; Margot R. Thigpen of the Office of the Director; and Sandra B. Houston and Sherry W. White, employees of Deltha-Critique in New Orleans, La., supporting the Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate and the Office of Center Operations, respectively.

Additional awards presented to Marshall employees and contractors included 15 NASA Early Career Achievement Medals; 21 NASA Silver Achievement Medals (18 individual awards, three team awards); 44 NASA Group Achievement Awards; 39 Marshall Center Director’s Commendation Honor Awards; 40 Marshall Certificates of Appreciation Honor Awards; 25 Marshall Group Achievement Honor Awards; six Marshall Research & Technology Awards; 10 Marshall Technology Transfer Awards; 35 Marshall Center Patent Awards for 2012-13; and one Marshall Center Software of the Year Award.

For a complete list of award recipients, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/about/star/agency_awards_13.html.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
NASA photograph

NASA begins engine test project for space launch system rocket

NASA photograph RS-25 rocket engine No. 0525 is positioned onto the A-1 Test Stand at NASAís Stennis Space Center in Mississippi preparation for a series of developmental tests. Engineers have taken a crucial step in preparing...
 
 

SSL selected to study asteroid retrieval for NASA

Space Systems/Loral, a leading provider of commercial satellites, announced July 18 that it was one of the companies selected by NASA to study system concepts and key technologies for NASA’s Asteroid Redirect Mission, which is expected to be a key part of the agency’s path to sending humans to Mars. SSL will conduct two studies;...
 
 
NASA image

NASA turns over next-gen air traffic management tool to FAA

NASA image As seen in this image, Terminal Sequencing and Spacing technology enables air traffic controllers to better manage the spacing between aircraft as they save both time and fuel and reducing emissions, flying more effi...
 

 
Image courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech, and SETI Institute

NASA seeks proposals for Europa mission science instruments

Image courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech, and SETI Institute Compiled from NASAís Galileo spacecraft data, this colorized surface image of Europa shows the blue-white terrains which indicate relatively pure water ice. Scientists are...
 
 

NASA announces early career faculty space tech research grants

NASA has selected seven university-led proposals for the study of innovative, early stage technologies that address high priority needs for America’s space program. The selected proposals for unique, disruptive, or transformational space technologies will address challenges in robotic mobility when traversing extreme terrain, in developing lightweight and multifunctional materials and str...
 
 
NASA photograph

NASA Armstrong recalls first moon landing, preps for ‘next giant leap’

NASA photograph In this 1967 NASA Flight Research Center photograph the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) No. 2 is viewed from the front. This photograph provides a good view of the pilot’s platform with the restricti...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>