Space

August 7, 2013

Media Invited to NASA Google+ Hangout on Wildfire and Climate Change

NASA will host a Google+ Hangout at 1 p.m. EDT Friday, Aug. 9, about wildfire research and what a changing climate could mean for future fire activity in the United States.

A decades-long record from ground surveys and NASA satellites shows† the fire season in the western United States is starting earlier in the spring and producing larger and more intense fires throughout the summer. Is this a result of climate change, or are other factors involved? How do scientists anticipate a continued increase in global temperatures will influence the number and strength of wildfires?

Panelists for the Google+ Hangout are:

  • Doug Morton, research scientist, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
  • Bill Patzert, research scientist, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
  • Elizabeth Reinhardt, national program leader for fire research, research and development, Office of the Climate Change Advisor, U.S. Forest Service, Washington

The panelists will discuss the 2013 fire season so far, recent trends in U.S. and global wildfires, and what climate projections reveal about potential fire activity in the future.

Journalists who want to ask questions by phone during this Google+ Hangout must provide their media affiliation information to Aries Keck at 301-286-4435 or aries.keck@nasa.gov by 10 a.m. Aug. 9. The Hangout will be broadcast publicly via NASA GoddardĂ­s YouTube and Google+ pages. The Hangout also will be carried live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

To join the Hangout, visit:
http://bit.ly/1cgYO1e
For NASA TV downlink, schedule and streaming video information, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/ntv
For more information about the NASA’s Earth science mission, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/earth
To view and post questions via Facebook, visit:
https://www.facebook.com/NASA




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

NASA completes MESSENGER mission with expected impact on Mercury’s surface

A NASA planetary exploration mission came to a planned, but nonetheless dramatic, end April 30 when it slammed into Mercury’s surface at about 8,750 mph and created a new crater on the planet’s surface. Mission controllers at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., have confirmed NASA’s MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry,...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Scott M. Ash

Air Force focuses on assured access to space

Air Force photograph by Scott M. Ash Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James and Gen. John E. Hyten, commander of Air Force Space Command, testify before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Subcommittee on Strategic Force...
 
 

NASA invests in hundreds of U.S. small businesses to enable future missions

NASA has selected research and technology proposals from 254 small businesses and 39 research institutions in the United States for grants to develop new technologies that will further NASA’s journey to Mars. The proposals are solicited, vetted and managed through NASA’s Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer programs. Proposals that lead to...
 

 

NASA brings in small business for further development of hypervelocity vehicles

NASA has awarded the Entry Systems Technology Research and Development contract to Analytical Mechanics Associates, Inc., a small business in Hampton, Va. As NASA continues on its journey to Mars, the ESTRAD contract will provide engineering support for the development of technologies that will be used to design and fabricate vehicles that travel at hypervelocities...
 
 
NASA photograph

NASA successfully tests shape-changing wing for next gen aviation

NASA photograph NASA successfully completed flight tests of a morphing wing technology. Flap angles were adjusted from -2 degrees up to 30 degrees during the six months of testing. NASA researchers, working in concert with the ...
 
 

Russian resupply ship experiencing difficulties; ISS, crew are fine

The six crew members of the International Space Station are safe and continuing regular operations with sufficient supplies as Russian flight controllers plan for another attempt to communicate with a cargo resupply spacecraft bound for the station. The next attempt to link with the spacecraft comes at 8:50 p.m. EDT Tuesday. The ISS Progress 59...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>