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August 12, 2013

Headlines August 12, 2013

News

Air Force identifies airman killed in helicopter crash

The Air Force has identified an airman killed in a helicopter crash last week as TSgt. Mark A Smith. Smith, of the 33rd Rescue Squadron, was killed when his HH-60G Pave Hawk crashed Aug. 5 in Okinawa, according to a news release from the 18th Wing. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

Afghans taking charge and changing names

Military announcements of deaths in Afghanistan — generally terse, bare-bones statements — have undergone a subtle change this summer, reflecting the shift to Afghans for the security of their country. The date, number of troops killed, general location and the type of attack accompany the most detailed news releases. Others merely state that a service member had been killed.

 

Business

Rockwell Collins to buy flight systems firm Arinc for $1.39 billion

Rockwell Collins Inc., a supplier of avionics and other electronic systems for commercial and military aircraft, has agreed to buy aerospace communications firm Arinc Inc. for $1.309 billion from the Carlyle Group Plc.

 

Defense

Pentagon readies sex assault rules to act before Congress

The Pentagon is preparing to issue policies aimed at curbing sexual assaults while stopping short of measures some members of Congress are seeking to impose.

Pentagon under pressure

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel says the Pentagon will be force to pick between maintaining troop levels and investing in new technology if sequestration doesn’t go away.

Army colonel: Physical strength not the end-all, be-all of combat service

An Army officer writing in a prestigious journal says the services should not overemphasize physical strength when deciding whether a woman qualifies for direct ground combat. Col. Ellen Haring, on the staff of the U.S. Army War College, says commanders need to downplay obstacle courses and judge a service member’s ability to stay calm and think quickly.

Obama will exempt military personnel if sequester continues

President Obama plans to exempt military personnel from sequestration next year if Congress does not act to cancel the automatic spending cuts, according to the White House budget office.

The ‘radical’ nuclear missile test that made history

For more than four decades it has ranked among the largest, most useful planes in the Pentagon’s arsenal, but a C-5 Galaxy has never been retired to any museum. That’s about to change.

 

Veterans

Jobs for the girls

From flying transport planes to preparing torpedoes, life for women on the Home Front during World War Two wasn’t all about cooking with coupons and dealing with the effects of relentless German bombing raids. While many did join the ARP [Air Raid Precautions] and work on the land, others became an integral part of the armed forces as these incredible snapshots from the 1940′s demonstrate.

 

Technology

Aloha from Space!

A $1 million NASA research mission is nearing completion as six crew members prepare to come back down to Earth – from the slope of a Hawaiian volcano. HI-SEAS (Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation) aims to address problems that may be encountered in future space missions by simulating exploration in areas of the world similar to space environments.

 

International

United Kingdom: Defense cuts ‘weakening effect of nuclear deterrent’

Vice-Admiral Sir Jeremy Blackham said cuts may leave a gap where future enemies could call Britain’s bluff, judging the United Kingdom would be unwilling to ever use a “disproportionate” nuclear response to a conventional attack. He said the nuclear deterrent was “not a substitute for conventional capabilities”, which had been badly hit by recent government cost-cutting.

Army cuts: Reservists slow to enlist, leaked memo suggests

The Army Reserve looks set to fall well short of its target for recruiting new members this year, confidential memos seen by the Sunday Times suggest. In the three months from April to June, only 367 soldiers enlisted – about a quarter of the target.




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Headlines April 21, 2014

News: Former Ranger breaks silence on Pat Tillman death: I may have killed him - Almost 10 years after the friendly fire death of former NFL star turned Army Ranger Pat Tillman, a fellow ranger admits that he may have been the one who fired the fatal shot.   Business: Ship study should favor existing designs -...
 
 

News Briefs April 21, 2014

Navy OKs changes for submariners’ sleep schedules The U.S. Navy has endorsed changes to submarine sailors’ schedules based on research into sleep patterns by a military laboratory in Connecticut. With no sunlight to set day apart from night on a submarine, the Navy for decades has staggered sailors’ working hours on schedules with little resemblance...
 
 

NASA cargo launches to space station aboard SpaceX resupply mission

Nearly 2.5 tons of NASA science investigations and cargo are on the way to the International Space Station aboard SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft. The spacecraft launched atop a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 3:25 p.m., EDT, April 18. The mission is the company’s third...
 

 

Boeing to give California workers $47 million in back pay

PALMDALE, Calif. – Boeing will pay $47 million to hundreds of current and former Southern California employees who are owed back pay and benefits, a union announced April 18. An arbitrator ruled against the aerospace giant in January and laid down guidelines for the payments and interest, but it took months to cull through records...
 
 

Headlines April 18, 2014

Business: Lockheed to Lose 17 F-35s Under Automatic Pentagon Cuts - Pentagon will cut 17 of the 343 F-35 fighters it planned to buy from Lockheed Martin in fiscal 2016 through 2019 unless Congress repeals automatic budget cuts, according to a new Defense Department report. DOD looking for ways not to break MH-60R helo deal - The...
 
 

News Briefs April 18, 2013

U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,177 As of April 15, 2014, at least 2,177 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count. At least 1,802 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result...
 




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