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August 26, 2013

California races other states to capture new space industry

As several new private ventures to take people on trips to space come closer to becoming reality, California lawmakers are racing other states to woo the new space companies with cushy incentives.

They are debating a bill now in Sacramento that would insulate manufacturers of spaceships and parts suppliers from liability should travelers get injured or killed on a voyage, except in cases such as gross negligence or intentional wrongdoing. Last year, the state enacted a law that shields space tourism companies such as Sir Richard Bransonís Virgin Galactic from similar lawsuits.

ìWeíre still in the fledgling part of space flight and space travel, and we need people to be able to take a risk,î said California Republican Sen. Steve Knight, who introduced both state bills.

Several other states ó including Texas, Florida, Virginia and New Mexico ó have passed similar laws, hoping to lure newcomers to the more than $200 billion commercial space flight industry.

Californiaís latest bill faces opposition from several lawmakers who say the state should not relax its standards since tourists should expect the ships they use to ascend to the heavens are safe. But space tourism companies say the protection is necessary if the state wants to attract and retain the industryís business.

Someday, something is going to crash and burn,î said Kathleen Allen, a professor of entrepreneurship at the University of Southern California who researches and advises new space companies. The question is: Are we going to be able to say thatís a price we pay to stretch and explore and go beyond our current limits?

Edwin Sahakian dreamed of flying in space since he watched Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon almost 45 years ago. Sahakian, 50, a trucking company owner from Glendale, Calif., is one of more than 600 people who have collectively paid about $75 million to embark on a trip in space with Virgin Galactic.

Leaving the planet is worth the risk, he said. Without incentives like limiting the ability of customers and family members to sue, he said the opportunity would never be open to him.

I’m not under the impression that itís as safe as flying on an airliner or anything remotely like that,î he said. ìBut I do feel like itís the safest way to go to space right now.

In April, Virgin Galacticís space ship completed its first powered flight, as its rocket engine burned for 16 seconds, propelling the ship to an altitude of 55,000 feet as it broke the sound barrier. The company expects to conduct flight testing this year and send people into space soon thereafter.

Other companies are also working to launch people beyond the earthís atmosphere. Billionaire entrepreneur Elon Muskís SpaceX is already ferrying cargo to the International Space Station. Last year, SpaceX signed an agreement with Nevada-based Bigelow Aerospace, which is designing inflatable space stations for research and maybe even tourists. SpaceX and other companies will provide the transportation ó like airlines ó and Bigelow the place to stay. AP




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