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August 26, 2013

Headlines August 26, 2013

News:

Obama awards Medal of Honor to SSgt. Ty Carter for heroism in Afghanistan

Army Staff Sgt. Ty M. Carter, the latest recipient of the nation’s highest military honor, hopes to use the award to help others suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, which has afflicted him since a 2009 battle in eastern Afghanistan that cost eight fellow soldiers their lives. President Obama awarded Carter the Medal of Honor in a White House ceremony Aug. 26, making the 33-year-old from Washington State the fifth living recipient of the decoration for heroic actions in Iraq or Afghanistan.

 

Business:

Meggitt agree to pay penalty after U.S. export control review

The U.S. unit of British aerospace and defense manufacturer Meggitt Plc has agreed to pay up to $25 million to resolve hundreds of possible export control violations the company uncovered in a review of operations dating back to the mid-1990s, the U.S. State Department said Aug. 23.

Report: United Tech, U.S. Reach Deal for F-35 Engines

Pratt & Whitney, a unit of United Technologies Corp, has reached an agreement in principle with the Pentagon on a contract to build 39 engines for a sixth batch of F-35 Joint Strike Fighters, three sources familiar with the deal said Aug. 26. The agreement – which Pratt had expected to reach over a month ago – is valued at more than $1 billion, said the sources, who were not authorized to speak publicly.

Northrop working on upgrades to keep Global Hawk flying

Northrop Grumman is working through internal testing to upgrade sensors for its embattled Global Hawk reconnaissance aircraft, trying to keep a variant of it alive while the Air Force continues to target it for cuts. The Air Force says its manned Cold War-era U-2s can do the intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance job with a better sensor payload than the new Block 30 variant of the massive, high-altitude unmanned Global Hawks.

‘Anaconda’ aims to develop autonomous river boat

Imagine being able to conduct surveillance, deliver supplies and even extract troops from a riverine war zone without sending a boat operator into danger. Swiftships Shipbuilders LLC tested a prototype riverine vessel earlier this year that eventually will be fully autonomous. The goal of the company’s Project Anaconda is to have the autonomous watercraft ready in about 18 months, said Eric Geibel, the director of special programs for Swiftships.

India: Plane designer mulls partnership to end delays

India, seeking to build its first regional aircraft, is considering roping in local and foreign partners for the project, after spending more than two decades to build a smaller plane.

BBA Aviation talks with Dubai Aerospace on combination

BBA Aviation Plc, the world’s largest provider of bases for business jets, and aircraft leasing company Dubai Aerospace Enterprise Ltd. Said they are discussing a combination of parts of their business.

 

Defense:

Guantanamo war crimes tribunal in ‘hot mess’ over computer problems

Defense lawyers asked the judge in the Guantanamo war crimes tribunal on Aug. 23 to halt pretrial hearings in the 9/11 case until technicians fix a slew of computer and email problems they said had made it nearly impossible to do their work.

 

International:

Royal Navy ready to launch first strike on Syria

Royal Navy vessels are being readied to take part in a possible series of cruise missile strikes, alongside the United States, as military commanders finalize a list of potential targets. Government sources said talks between the Prime Minister and international leaders, including Barack Obama, would continue, but that any military action that was agreed could begin within the next week.

 

Viewpoint:

Manning and Hasan: The price of PC in the military

The story of 25-year-old Army Pvt. Bradley Manning, now convicted of espionage, demoted and sentenced to 35 years at Fort Leavenworth prison, has taken a bizarre turn. In the same week, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, a bearded jihadist wearing an Army uniform, sat in a Texas courtroom hearing evidence of his mass murder. Both cases raise similar questions: Did political sensitivities increase dangers that could have been avoided?

Egypt shows why foreign arms sales won’t sustain defense industrial base

In 2012, the Department of Defense received $118 billion for weapons procurement.  Next Next year, it will receive less than $100 billion — a lot less if the deficit-cutting mechanism called sequestration again kicks in.  Tony Capaccio of Bloomberg Bloomberg News revealed last week that sequestration could drag down budget authority for weapons procurement by another 16 percent from the administration’s already reduced 2014 request, to a figure somewhere in the mid-eighty billions.




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Headlines April 23, 2014

News: U.S. conducts spy flights over Russia - After a tit-for-tat series of delays, the United States conducted an Open Skies Treaty intelligence flight over Russian territory April 21, a State Department official said.  Army paratroopers heading to Poland after Russian annexation of Crimea - U.S. Army paratroopers are arriving in Poland to begin a series of...
 
 

News Briefs April 23, 2014

U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,177 As of April 22, 2014, at least 2,177 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count. The AP count is one less than the Defense Department’s tally. At least...
 
 

Australia lifts F-35 order from 14 to 72 fighters

Australia announced April 23 that it had increased its order for F-35 Joint Strike Fighters by 58 to 72 to be fully operational by 2023 in a declaration of confidence in the troubled stealth war plane. The government expects the additional 58 U.S. jets, developed by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., will cost 12.4 billion Australian...
 

 

Textron eliminating 750 Cessna, Beechcraft jobs

Just over a month after buying Beechcraft for $1.4 billion, Textron announced 750 job cuts at that company and at its Cessna division. The layoffs will occur over the next 60 days. Both aircraft makers are based in Wichita, Kansas, and Textron says about 575 of the affected jobs are based in Kansas. Management and...
 
 

Headlines April 21, 2014

News: Former Ranger breaks silence on Pat Tillman death: I may have killed him - Almost 10 years after the friendly fire death of former NFL star turned Army Ranger Pat Tillman, a fellow ranger admits that he may have been the one who fired the fatal shot.   Business: Ship study should favor existing designs -...
 
 

News Briefs April 21, 2014

Navy OKs changes for submariners’ sleep schedules The U.S. Navy has endorsed changes to submarine sailors’ schedules based on research into sleep patterns by a military laboratory in Connecticut. With no sunlight to set day apart from night on a submarine, the Navy for decades has staggered sailors’ working hours on schedules with little resemblance...
 




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