Business

August 26, 2013

Northrop Grumman completes successful demonstration of 3DELR radar system

Northrop Grumman has completed a successful full-scale demonstration of its Three-Dimensional Expeditionary Long-Range Radar for the U.S. Air Force last month.

Approximately 40 members of the U.S. Air Force, Marine Corps and the Office of the Secretary of Defense were on site to witness the comprehensive demonstration of Northrop Grumman’s radar system. More than 50 additional participants and observers were connected in real time at multiple locations via secure webcast.

“The U.S. Air Force system variant of the Department of Defense AN/TPS-80 radar performed exceptionally well during this comprehensive demonstration,” said Jeff Palombo, vice president and general manager of Northrop Grumman’s Land and Self Protection Systems Division. “This mature system is a low-risk solution that can provide significant immediate and long-term development, production and logistics cost savings for our Air Force customer.”

During the demonstration, Northrop Grumman’s 3DELRR performed long-range detection and tracking of live aircraft via high-power S-Band Gallium Nitride transmit/receive modules while showing successful system ambient air cooling under extremely hot operating conditions and comprehensive automatic system self-test and calibration capabilities.

Designed to replace the current AN/TPS-75 radar systems, 3DELRR will be the primary Air Force ground-based, long-range radar for detecting airborne threats.

Based on Northrop Grumman’s active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar technology, the company’s 3DELRR solution is a highly mobile, affordable and reliable radar system that will give the Air Force powerful new air defense capabilities.

Northrop Grumman is a leader in the development of AESA radar systems. The company’s ground radar systems include the AN/TPS-80 Ground/Air Task Oriented Radar and Highly Adaptable Multi-Mission Radar AESA systems as well as the solid-state AN/TPS-78 and TPS-703 radar systems.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines July 30, 2014

News: Software to power F-35 running as much as 14 months late¬†- Software needed to operate Lockheed Martin’s F-35 jet, the Pentagon’s costliest weapons system, may be as much as 14 months late for required flight testing, according to a Pentagon review.   Business: Lockheed will turn on JLTV production line In August; 6-D truck...
 
 

News Briefs July 30, 2014

U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,197 As of July 29, 2014, at least 2,197 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count. At least 1,819 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result...
 
 
Lockheed Martin photograph by Tom Reynolds

F-35B successfully completes wet runway, crosswind testing

Lockheed Martin photograph by Tom Reynolds F-35B aircraft BF-4, piloted by Lockheed Martin Test Pilot Dan Levin, starts down the runway as part of wet runway and crosswind testing at Edwards AFB, Calif. In an important program ...
 

 
boeing-chinook

Boeing delivers first U.S. Army multiyear II configured Chinook

Boeing July 29 delivered the first multiyear II configured CH-47F Chinook helicopter to the U.S. Army one month ahead of schedule. The delivery was celebrated in a ceremony at the production facility in Ridley Township, Penn. ‚...
 
 
Army photograph by SSgt. Angela Stafford

Engineers developing safer, more accurate tracer round

Army photograph Tracer rounds enable the shooter to follow the projectile trajectory to make aiming corrections. However, the light emitted by these rounds also gives away the position of the shooter. Engineers at Picatinny Ars...
 
 
NASA photograph by Carla Thomas

Katherine Lott awarded NASA Armstrong employee scholarship

NASA photograph by Carla Thomas Katherine Lott, the recipient of the 2014 NASA Armstrong Employee Exchange Council Joseph R. Vensel Memorial Scholarship, is congratulated by NASA Armstrong center director David McBride. Flankin...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>