Space

September 20, 2013

International partnership releases space exploration benefits paper

NASA and the International Space Exploration Coordination Group released a white paper Friday outlining benefits of human exploration of space.

The document, titled “Benefits Stemming from Space Exploration,” is the culmination of a dialog between space agencies participating in the ISECG. The goal was to share their views and lessons learned on the nature and significance of benefits resulting from space exploration. The paper describes the fundamental benefits that are expected to flow from continued investment in the missions and activities described in the Global Exploration Roadmap, which was released on Aug. 20.

Although not intended to be a definitive statement on exploration’s relevance to society, the paper reflects the strong commitment by space agencies to deliver benefits to everyone on Earth.

The paper outlines the collective benefits of space exploration, including expanding our scientific knowledge, inspiring people around the world, and forging agreements and cooperation between the countries engaged in the peaceful exploration of space. The paper stresses human exploration’s effects on enhancing our quality of life by improving economic prosperity, health, environmental quality, safety and security. The paper also highlights the equally important ability for exploration to provide a better understanding and new perspectives on our individual and collective place in the universe.

The International Space Station is demonstrating many of these benefits today. The orbiting laboratory is the first step in the future exploration framework described in the Global Exploration Roadmap. The benefits described in this paper provide some of the rationale for the nations wishing to pursue the activities highlighted in the roadmap.

To view ISECG’s “Benefits Stemming from Space Exploration” and the Global Exploration Roadmap, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1d0cShx.




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