In the news...

September 20, 2013

Military chiefs called to task on spending issues

Pauline Jelinek
Associated Press

The head of the House Armed Services Committee on Sept. 18 told the nation’s top military brass that their credibility is on the lineî if they don’t give greater details about how budget cuts will affect national security.

ìGentlemen, for two years you or your predecessors have come to this committee describing the consequences of sequestration in generalities and percentages,î California Republican Rep. Howard P. ìBuckî McKeon told the military service chiefs in opening a hearing on Capitol Hill.

ìToday I expect to hear – in very clear terms – what elements of that security you will no longer be in a position to provideî should the cuts continue, McKeon told the chiefs of staff of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. He was referring to the automatic spending cuts that kicked in March 1; they are projected to slash $52 billion from the defense budget for fiscal 2014, resulting from Congress’ failure to trim the federal deficit.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno was ready with some figures.

He testified the Army would have to shrink its active duty force by 26 percent, to 420,000 people. Odierno also said that readiness would be degraded to the point where 85 percent of the force by the end of the next budget year would not be prepared to deploy if a conflict popped up somewhere in the world.

Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh III said his service in the next budget year would have to cut flying hours by 15 percent, personnel by 25,000 or 4 percent, and aircraft by 550 or 9 percent.
Top civilian and uniformed defense officials tried for months to stop the cuts and have warned repeatedly of severe and unacceptable effects on the U.S. military if Congress doesn’t end them.

Rep. Adam Smith of Washington, ranking Democrat on the committee, said lawmakers were to blame.

ìYou all have extremely hard jobs, and I am afraid that we in Congress have not made them any easier by allowing sequestration to take effect,î Smith told the chiefs in a statement prepared for the hearing.

Without a doubt, the Department of Defense must become more efficient, Smith said. But sequestration will continue to force the department to make unacceptable cuts.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines July 23, 2014

News: Israel’s Iron Dome defense in line for tripled U.S. spending - Israel’s iron Dome missile defense system may end up getting triple the U.S. funding that the Defense Department sought for it in March. Ukraine asked U.S. for systems to counter Russian missiles - A month before the United States says a Russian missile likely brought...
 
 

News Briefs July 23, 2014

U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,194 As of July 22, 2014, at least 2,194 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count. The AP count is three less than the Defense Department’s tally. At least...
 
 
Raytheon photograph

Raytheon completes key Air, Missile Defense Radar reviews

Raytheon photograph Partially-populated, full-sized Air and Missile Defense Radar array. Raytheon has completed two critical program reviews for the new Air and Missile Defense Radar, the U.S. Navy’s next generation integ...
 

 
Insitu photograph

Insitu demonstrates long endurance capabilities of Integrator unmanned aircraft

Insitu photograph Insitu’s Integrator unmanned aircraft recovers via SkyHook; the aircraft recently completed a 24-hour endurance flight. Insitu announced July 22 the successful 24-hour flight of its Integrator unmanned a...
 
 

NASA partners punctuate summer with spacecraft development advances

Spacecraft and rocket development is on pace this summer for NASA’s aerospace industry partners for the agency’s Commercial Crew Program as they progress through systems testing, review boards and quarterly sessions under their† Space Act Agreements with the agency. NASA engineers and specialists continue their review of the progress as the agency and partners move...
 
 

U.S. Navy selects Northrop Grumman for ship self-defense system

The U.S. Navy has awarded Northrop Grumman a $12 million task order for a full range of engineering services to continue modernizing the Ship Self-Defense System Mark 2. The contract has a potential value of $61 million over five years, if all options are exercised. SSDS MK2 is a combat system designed for anti-air defense...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>