Space

September 25, 2013

Twelve NASA Explorer Schools receive honor awards, grants

NASA has recognized 12 NASA Explorer Schools from 11 U.S. states for their contributions to science, technology, engineering or mathematics education in the 2012-2013 school year.

All 12 schools will receive a NASA certificate of recognition that includes an American flag that was flown in space. Six of the 12 also submitted successful proposals to a recent NASA Explorer Schools solicitation and will receive a $5,000 grant to help implement a STEM project in their classrooms by April 2014.

The schools identified as leaders in STEM education and selected to receive a NASA Explorer Schools Honor Award are:

• Forest Lake Technology Magnet, Columbia, S.C.

• Academy of Information Technology and Engineering, Stamford, Conn.

• Woodrow Wilson Middle School, Glendale, Calif.

• Mack Benn Jr. Elementary School, Suffolk, Va.

• Franke Park Elementary School, Fort Wayne, Ind.

• Ferndale Middle School, High Point, N.C.

The six schools also receiving a $5,000 grant are:

• Cardinal Gibbons High School, Raleigh, N.C.

• Northland Preparatory Academy, Flagstaff, Ariz.

• Stoney Creek High School, Rochester Hills, Mich.

• St. Mary’s Visitation School, Elm Grove, Wis.

• Corpus Christi Catholic School, Chambersburg, Penn.

• Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Germantown, Tenn.

“Congratulations to the 2012-2013 honor award and grant winners,” said Diane DeTroye, NASA’s director of STEM engagement in Washington. “By using NASA educational resources, innovative teachers brought new approaches to their classrooms to engage their students in STEM studies.”

A team of NASA education professionals selected these 12 schools for their exemplary classroom practices and innovative uses of NASA educational content to engage a broad school population in STEM activities.

The NASA Explorer Schools project infuses STEM content related to the agency’s missions and programs into classroom lessons for students in grades 4-12.

For more information about NASA Explorer Schools visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.

 




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