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October 28, 2013

Headlines October 28, 2013

Business:

Eaton CEO sees Europe boosting product demand in 2014 -

Eaton’s Chief Executive Officer Sandy Cutler forecast an increase in demand in its markets of as much as 4 percent next year, spurred by economic recovery in Europe.

EADS plans to cut jobs, costs at defense unit -

European aerospace group EADS is planning to cut jobs and costs in its defense division, the group’s chief executive was quoted by a German newspaper as saying.

 

Defense:

Pentagon wants F-35 contractor accountability as it weights output boost -

The Pentagon’s chief arms buyer wants details on how Lockheed Martin and other companies will be held accountable for the quality and reliability of the F-35 fighter jets as he considers whether to approve an increase in the plane’s production, U.S. defense officials said Oct. 25.

V-22 readiness rates flawed, Pentagon’s inspector finds -

U.S. Marine Corps personnel improperly recorded data used to measure the combat readiness of the MV-22 Osprey made by Textron and Boeing in the three years ending in 2011, according to the Pentagon’s inspector general.

Lawmaker sustains six-month hold on three-star’s nomination -

For six months, a prominent Democratic lawmaker has blocked Lt. Gen. Susan Helms’ nomination to be vice commander of Space Command, making it unlikely that she will ever be confirmed.

Bulky troops turn to liposuction to pass fat test -

The soldiers often call Dr. Adam Tattelbaum, a plastic surgeon, in a panic. They need liposuction, and fast. A number of military personnel are turning to the surgical procedure to remove excess fat from around the waist so they can pass the Pentagon’s body fat test, which can determine their future prospects in the military.

Victim of sequestration, Space Fence costs jump -

While the sequestration budget cuts were intended to reduce government spending, two top Air Force officials say the sequester has already increased the costs to the Pentagon’s key space awareness program.

 

Veterans:

VFW urges members to attend hearings on pay, benefits -

The nation’s largest organization for combat veterans is encouraging its members to attend two public hearings next week of a Pentagon commission looking at changes in military pay and benefits.

Finding love in the trenches -

They were far away from home, under attack, surrounded by men in the mud – and clearly in serious need of some female companionship. Now, archived records released today have revealed how lonely soldiers looking for love during the First World War proposed to women they had never met after being sent letters to the trenches.

 

Space:

Make more giant leaps for mankind -

Jim Lovell, who brought the stricken Apollo 13 spacecraft back to Earth as the world watched, warned the spirit of the Sixties and Seventies had been lost because of the lack of manned missions to the Moon and Mars.

Titan’s lakes revealed -

It’s long been known the surface of Titan, a giant moon orbiting around Saturn, is covered in lakes but now never-before-seen images reveal new clues as to how these lakes may have formed. The shots, taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, were captured as the moon entered its Spring season, meaning the sun was shining down onto its north pole making it possible to capture them for the first time.

ESA’s Mars rover prototype, ‘Bridget,’ takes test drive in Chilean desert -

A disruptive dust devil did not stop a European Mars rover prototype from finishing its work in the Chilean desert recently, though the wind storm did force researchers to take shelter as it carried away a chair from the nearby remote control center.

Asteroid technology: How astronomers find dangerous near-Earth space rocks -

Searching for potentially Earth-destroying asteroids today isn’t easy. They’re dark, difficult to see from the surface of the planet, and there are a lot of them floating in the solar system. Scientists are now looking into new, higher-tech ways to find and track near-Earth objects, but for now, much of the hard work of asteroid tracking is done the old-fashioned way: with a telescope on a clear night.

Black hole ‘burps’ revealed in Sagittarius A -

These days, the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy appears to be pretty docile. This wasn’t always the case.




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Headlines October 1, 2014

Veterans: Substantial VA staff will face discipline - A substantial number of VA employees will face punishment for the veterans treatment scandal, the new national commander of the American Legion predicted Sept. 30, indicating that the slow pace of discipline has more to do with the hoops the department must jump through than it does a...
 
 

News Briefs October 1, 2014

Egypt president gives army control of arms imports The Egyptian president has amended a law, giving the country’s army control over weapons and ammunition imports. The Sept. 30 statement from the presidency says Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi changed articles stipulating that a permit for weapons’ imports has to be granted by the Interior Ministry, which is in...
 
 
atk-test

ATK successfully tests Orion launch abort motor igniter

NASA and ATK successfully completed a static test of the launch abort motor igniter for the Orion crew capsule’s Launch Abort System. Conducted at ATK’s facility in Promontory, Utah, this test is the next step towa...
 

 
uav-coalition

Small UAV coalition launched to advance commercial use of unmanned aerial vehicles

Leading technology companies Oct. 1 formally announced the formation of the Small UAV Coalition to help pave the way for commercial, philanthropic, and civil use of small unmanned aerial vehicles in the United States and abroad...
 
 
Navy photograph

NAWCWD manned for unmanned systems

Navy photograph A rail launch is performed during Integrator unmanned aerial vehicle testing at Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division China Lake, Calif. Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division scientists, engineers, techn...
 
 
NASA photograph by Ken Ulbrich

NASA employees go ‘above and beyond’

Courtesy photograph NASA Chief Scientist Albion Bowers, Christopher Miller and Nelson Brown receive the Exception Engineering Achievement Medal at Armstrong Research Center, Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. The prestigious award ...
 




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