Space

October 28, 2013

Lockheed Martin powers up Orion crew module

Technicians power on the Orion crew module at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

For the first time, Lockheed Martin and NASA engineers powered on the Orion crew module at Kennedy Space Center last week.

The test successfully demonstrated the crew module avionics were integrated properly and are in good health.

During the test, operators in the Test Launch and Control Center introduced software scripts to the crew module’s main control computers via thousands of wires and electrical ground support equipment. During this process, the foundational elements, or the “heart and brains” of the entire system were evaluated. The main computers received commands from the ground, knew where to send them, read the data from different channels, and successfully relayed electrical responses back to the TLCC.

The crew module power systems will continue to undergo testing for six months as additional electronics are added to the spacecraft.

This critical milestone brings together hundreds of separate electronic elements that have been designed, built, and tested by dozens of companies across the country involved in the Orion program.

“This spacecraft is capable of taking humans farther into space than they’ve ever gone before,” said Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin program manager for Orion. “For over a year, the team has been developing, testing, and installing critical equipment to the crew module, which has now been shown to integrate flawlesslyóit’s an incredible engineering achievement.”

The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is NASA’s first spacecraft designed for long-duration, human-rated, deep space exploration. Orion will transport humans to interplanetary destinations beyond low Earth orbit, such as asteroids, the moon and eventually Mars, and return them safely back to Earth.

Lockheed Martin is the prime contractor to NASA for Orion, and is responsible for the design, build, testing, launch processing and mission operations of the spacecraft.

About one year from now, Orion will complete its first mission. Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) will launch an uncrewed spacecraft from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center 3,600 miles beyond low Earth orbit.

That same day, Orion will return to Earth at a speed of approximately 20,000 mph for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. EFT-1 will provide engineers with critical data about Orion’s heat shield, flight systems and capabilities to validate designs of the spacecraft before it begins carrying humans to new destinations in the solar system.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines May 6, 2015

News: President nominates Gen. Joseph F. Dunford as Joint Chiefs chairman - President Obama nominated Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford May 5 as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, calling the commander of troops in Iraq and Afghanistan “a proven leader.”   Business: U.S. Air Force says may revisit rocket plan if firms do...
 
 

News Briefs May 6, 2015

NATO to briefly move command headquarters A top NATO commander says the alliance will briefly move an allied joint force command headquarters to Romania as NATO continues to hone its ability to react to Russia’s moves in Ukraine and other security challenges. U.S Navy Adm. Mark E. Ferguson III, commander of the Allied Joint Force...
 
 
Boeing photograph

Australia accepts new Boeing CH-47F Chinook aircraft

Boeing photograph Boeing has delivered the first two of seven CH-47F Chinooks to the Australian Army at a ceremony in Queensland. The remaining aircraft will be delivered throughout 2015. At a May 5 ceremony at Royal Australian...
 

 
Northrop Grumman photograph

RQ-4 Global Hawk achieves milestone C

Northrop Grumman photograph A U.S. Air Force RQ-4 Global Hawk on a runway in Palmdale, Calif. The U.S. Air Force RQ-4 Global Hawk high altitude, long endurance autonomous unmanned aircraft system successfully completed Mileston...
 
 
Army photograph by Maj. Daniel Markert

‘Futurist’ predicts Far East challenges for expeditionary Army

Army photograph by Maj. Daniel Markert Soldiers will face anti-satellite operations and electronic warfare in the future, predicted Dr. Andrew F. Krepinevich Jr., president of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments,...
 
 

Boeing upgrading Australian F/A-18 trainers to aid maintenance effectiveness

Boeing will update two maintenance trainers for the Royal Australian Air Force so they better support the RAAFís F/A-18F and EA-18G aircraft. Australia is the only nation other than the United States flying F/A-18 Super Hornet fighters and EA-18G Growler airborne electronic attack aircraft. While it operates the two-seat F variant of the Super Hornet,...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>