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October 28, 2013

News Briefs October 28, 2013

Army obtains license for Hawaii depleted uranium

The Army has obtained a license to possess depleted uranium at its Pohakuloa Training Area on the Big Island and for Schofield Barracks on Oahu.

The license was granted Oct. 23 by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

The Army Garrison-Hawaii website says the military between 1960 and 1968 used 8-by-1-inch spotting rounds containing 6.7 ounces of depleted uranium alloy to identify the flight path of Davy Crockett warheads.

The weakly radioactive alloy was added to add weight to the spotting rounds.
Fragments were discovered six years ago.

The Hawaii Tribune-Herald reports the license requires the Army to follow a radiation safety plan for the installations.

Peace activist Jim Albertini says live fire should be stopped at Pohakuloa and all depleted uranium should be cleaned up. AP

Japan protests South Korean military drill on islands

Japan protested Oct. 25 to South Korea for holding a military exercise on a disputed island cluster in the Sea of Japan claimed by Tokyo but controlled by Seoul.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said a landing drill by South Korean navy and coast guard personnel on the island group, called Takeshima by Japan and Dokdo by South Korea, violated Japanese sovereignty.

ìIt’s totally unacceptable and extremely regrettable,î Suga told a regular news conference, repeating his government’s claims that the island group is part of Japan’s territory historically and under international law. He said Japan’s Foreign Ministry lodged a protest both in Tokyo and Seoul.

Tensions between the countries have spiked since South Korean President Lee Myung-bak visited the island last year. AP

Navy’s first ‘supercarrier’ going to scrap heap

A Texas recycler is being paid 1 cent to haul away and dismantle the U.S. Navy’s first “supercarrier.”

The USS Forrestal was decommissioned in September 1993, after more than 38 years of service. It was launched in 1954 and commissioned in 1955.

It is best known for a 1967 fire on its flight deck that killed 132 crewmen and injured 62 others.
The Navy in 1999 had made the Forrestal available for donation as a museum or memorial. But it was re-designated for disposal in 2003 after no feasible applications for reuse were received.

The ship is expected to depart Philadelphia before the end of the year and be taken to a facility in Brownsville owned by All Star Metals. AP




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