Space

November 15, 2013

NASA issues 2014 call for advanced technology concepts

NASA is looking for visionary concepts that have the potential to enable new missions or significantly improve current approaches to achieve aerospace objectives.

Through the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts program, NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate is seeking proposals for revolutionary concepts with the potential to transform aerospace endeavors.

These include visionary aerospace architecture, system or mission concepts that are exciting and unexplored, yet credible and executable.

“It’s through visionary thinking that transformative ideas go from concept to reality,” said Michael Gazarik, NASA’s associate administrator for space technology in Washington. “Our NIAC program provides an onramp for early stage technology concepts to take seed and potentially create revolutionary new capabilities for space exploration that might one day change how we live and work as we explore the cosmos.”

NIAC’s current portfolio includes multiple technology areas contributing to innovations in human systems, sensing or imaging, revolutionary construction, autonomous exploration, and aerospace transportation.

NIAC study concepts are early in development — generally 10 years or more from operation. They are chosen based on peer review of the potential impact, technical strength and benefits of the proposed study.

This call is for proposals for NIAC Phase 1, which offers as much as $100,000 for nine months of study to advance the innovative space technology concept and help NASA meet current operational and future mission requirements.

Past NIAC Phase 1 proposals have included a broad range of imaginative and creative ideas, such as using electromagnets to protect spacecraft from radiation or the application of Terrestrial Ocean exploring concepts for extremely low-power exploration of under-ice oceans. Other study concepts have included printing entire spacecraft on sheets of paper; a solid-state, no-moving-parts air purifier; and other innovative propulsion and power ideas needed for future space mission operations.

The NIAC Phase 1 solicitation will incorporate a two-step process. NIAC will accept short proposals, limited to three pages, until Dec. 18. After review, NASA will invite those whose proposal concepts are of interest to the agency to submit a full proposal of no more than eight pages. Full proposals will be due early March 2014.

The solicitation is open to all U.S. citizens and researchers working in the U.S., including NASA civil servants. Selection announcements are expected in mid-2014. The number of NIAC awards will depend on the strength of proposals and availability of appropriated funds.

Those whose proposals are selected for Phase 1 development may later submit proposals for a NIAC Phase 2 award. Phase 2 proposal selectees may receive up to $500,000 over two years to further analyze and develop their innovative concepts and help create new avenues for future NASA missions, dependent upon availability of appropriated funds.

This NASA early investment and partnership with creative scientists, engineers and citizen inventors will pay huge technological dividends and help maintain America’s leadership in the global technology economy.

The Space Technology Mission Directorate is responsible for innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in future missions. To learn more about it, the NIAC program, and view the NASA Research Announcement for this NIAC Phase I solicitation, visit http://www.nasa.gov/niac.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines July 31, 2015

News: Carter: Military leaders could arm more troops at home – Following the recent fatal shooting of four Marines and a sailor in Tennessee, Defense Secretary Ash Carter is ordering the military services to consider new policies that would enhance security for troops at home, including potentially arming more personnel.   Business: DOD weighs supplier base,...
 
 

News Briefs July 31, 2015

U.S. delivering eight newer F-16 warplanes to Egypt The United States Embassy in Cairo says the U.S. is delivering eight newer F-16 warplanes to Egypt as part of an ongoing military support package. It says in a July 30 statement that the aircraft, of the current Block 52 production variant, will be flown in from...
 
 
Lockheed Martin photograph

Lockheed Martin successfully tests design changes for Orion spacecraft’s fairing separation system

Lockheed Martin photograph A protective panel for Orion’s service module is jettisoned during testing at Lockheed Martin’s Sunnyvale, California facility. This test series evaluated design changes to the spacecraft’s fair...
 

 

Australian company to provide parts for initial production of Triton UAS

Northrop Grumman has awarded the first Australian supplier contract for the U.S. Navy’s MQ-4C Triton unmanned aircraft system initial production lot to Ferra Engineering. Brisbane-based Ferra Engineering will manufacture mechanical sub-assemblies for the first four Triton air vehicles including structural components. “At Northrop Grumman it’s very important to not only develop...
 
 
Boeing photograph

CH-46 ‘Phrog’ makes its last hop

Boeing photograph The CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter commonly known as the “Phrog,” is set to retire and to be flown one last time by Reserve Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron (HMM) 774 on Aug. 1. The CH-46 Sea Knight is a med...
 
 

Insitu awarded LRIP Lot IV RQ-21A Blackjack Systems contract

Under the terms of its latest contract, Insitu will build six RQ-21A Blackjack systems for the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The $78-million Small Tactical Unmanned Aircraft Systems Lot IV Low Rate Initial Production contract is the latest event in the program’s progression toward the Initial Operational Test and Evaluation phase.   “This award will...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>