Business

November 18, 2013

Boeing Huntington Beach marks 50th anniversary, looks to future

Boeing is celebrating 50 years of innovation at its Huntington Beach campus, where accomplishments span from the Apollo program to the International Space Station to current advances in cybersecurity, C4ISR and other areas. In this photo, Boeing software engineer Darin Anderson prepares a Space Environmental NanoSat Experiment (SENSE) satellite for final testing at the site.

HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif. – Boeing is celebrating 50 years of innovation at its Huntington Beach campus, where accomplishments span from the Apollo program to the International Space Station to current advances in cybersecurity, C4ISR and other areas.

Dedicated on Nov. 14, 1963, the 187-acre site continues to support progress in small satellite technology, protected radio communications, networked systems, advanced manufacturing and unmanned underwater vehicles, among others.

Rocket scientists, engineers and technicians at Huntington Beach developed America’s most important space vehicles and platforms. Those included the Saturn V upper stage that launched astronauts to the moon, NASA’s space shuttles, and the family of Delta rockets that has delivered hundreds of commercial and military satellites to orbit.

“From its beginnings, Boeing Huntington Beach has been responsible for tremendous innovations in space, security and communications,” said Alex Lopez, Huntington Beach site executive and vice president, Boeing Advanced Network & Space Systems. “With the talents and capabilities of our people added to our efforts to increase affordability and productivity, this site will continue to make valuable contributions to national defense, space exploration and other Boeing efforts.”

Some of the cutting-edge activities currently at the site include:

  • Phantom Phoenix prototype small satellites
  • The autonomous rendezvous and docking system for NASA’s Crew Space Transportation (CST)-100 vehicle
  • NASA Space Launch System’s main propulsion systems design and testing
  • The liquid hydrogen fuel system on the Phantom Eye high-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle
  • Cybersecurity technology prototypes.



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