Business

December 13, 2013

Boeing realigns research, technology unit for growth, productivity

Boeing announced Dec. 12 it will establish technology research centers in Alabama, California, Missouri, South Carolina and Washington as it continues to lay the foundation for increased competitiveness and future growth.

The company will restructure its Boeing Research & Technology organization, the company’s central research-and-development unit, through the establishment of research centers in Huntsville, Ala.; Southern California; St. Louis; North Charleston, S.C.; and Seattle.

The new centers will operate independently but cooperatively with one another and with Boeing technology centers in Australia, Brazil, China, India, Spain and Russia. The international centers conduct research to benefit the environment, aviation safety, air traffic management and other areas.

“We are reorganizing and realigning our research-and-technology operations to better meet the needs of our Commercial Airplanes and Defense, Space & Security business units, as well as our government R&D customers,” said Greg Hyslop, vice president and general manager of Boeing Research & Technology. “Our customers have a common need for new technology that can be integrated quickly and efficiently into current products and production lines, as well as enable new market-leading products and services.

With these changes, we are enhancing our ability to provide effective, efficient and innovative technology solutions.”

Earlier this year, Boeing announced the geographic diversification of its Information Technology organization, as well as engineering design centers within Boeing Commercial Airplanes. BR&T’s realignment continues the company’s strategy of pursuing future growth and competitiveness while consistently delivering on the company’s promises to its customers.

The new research centers will consolidate technology development of strategic importance to Boeing over the long-term ñ up to 30 years into the future. They will be chartered to accelerate technical capability in specific fields and enhance and build networks of collaboration with university, industry and government research centers around the world.

The new locations and centers:

  • Huntsville, Ala.: Simulation and Decision Analytics; Metals and Chemical Technology
  • Southern California: Flight Sciences; Electronics and Networked Systems; Structures
  • St. Louis: Systems Technology; Digital Aviation and Support Technology; Metallics and Fabrication Development
  • North Charleston, S.C.: Manufacturing Technology
  • Seattle: Manufacturing Technology Integration.

As the centers are established, BR&T employee totals are expected to grow between 300-400 each in Alabama, Missouri and South Carolina. BR&T jobs in Washington are expected to decrease by 800-1,200, and BR&T jobs in California are expected to decrease by 200-300.

The unit will continue to provide manufacturing technology integration support at Boeing business unit production sites in Washington state, as well as Arizona, California, Missouri, Pennsylvania and South Carolina.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines November 17, 2014

News: Fight over A-10 re-opens Hill, Air Force divide - After a relatively quiet summer, the battle for the future of the A-10 Warthog exploded in the last two weeks, reopening deep fissures between Congress and the Air Force that seem to show the two sides at a total stalemate. Chances for sequester relief fade as...
 
 

News Briefs Nov, 17, 2014

Second stealthy destroyer starting to take shape The second of three stealthy destroyers under construction in Maine is starting to take shape. The Navy says it has completed the hoisting of the 1,000-ton composite deckhouse onto the 610-foot hull of the future USS Michael Monsoor. It took four cranes to complete the job Nov. 14....
 
 
NASA photograph by Jim Yungel

NASA DC-8 continues west Antarctic ice study

NASA photograph by Jim Yungel The Thurston Island calving front off of western Antarctica as seen from the window of NASA’s DC-8 flying observatory Nov. 5, 2014. NASA’s DC-8 flying laboratory has two weeks of suppor...
 

 
NASA photograph by Emmett Given

NASA opens registration for 2015 Exploration Rover Challenge

NASA photograph by Emmett Given Pedaling across a simulated alien landscape of rock, craters and shifting sand is one of the nearly 90 teams of high school, college and university students from across the United States and arou...
 
 
Lockheed Martin photograph

Lockheed Martin begins final assembly of NASA’s next Mars lander

Lockheed Martin photograph Technicians in a Lockheed Martin clean room prepare NASA’s InSight Mars lander for propulsion proof and leak testing on Oct. 31, 2014. Following the test, the lander was moved to another clean room ...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Isaac Cruz

‘Batman’ fix to sustain C-5s for decades, saving millions

Robins Air Force Base, Ga., has hit another milestone by being the first to complete a new major structural repair on a C-5M which will bring in millions of dollars in revenue and sustain the Air Force’s fleet for decades...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>