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December 16, 2013

Headlines December 16, 2013

News:

Boeing reviewing 54 sites for 777X after union talks fail -

Boeing is reviewing 54 sites in 22 states to build its 777X aircraft after union chiefs balked at contract concessions and said rank-and-file members wouldn’t vote on the company’s latest terms.

 

Business:

AIG to sell aircraft leasing business in $5.4 billion deal -

American International Group said it would sell its aircraft leasing business to AerCap Holdings NV in a deal valued at about $5.4 billion, marking the insurer’s exit from its last non-core business.

Pratt & Whitney expects partial deal to sustain F-35 jet engines soon -

Engine maker Pratt & Whitney, a unit of United Technologies Corp., said Dec. 13 that it expected to sign a partial agreement before the end of the year to fund operations and maintenance of the next batch of engines it is building for the Lockheed Martin F-35 fighter jet.

Lockheed sees F-16 fighter jet production continuing through 2020 -

Lockheed Martin has enough orders to keep its F-16 fighter jet production line humming through the third quarter of 2017, and hopes to land additional orders that would keep the line running through 2020, company executives say.

Lockheed aims to deliver all 36 F-35 jets in 2013, sees progress on program -

Lockheed Martin still expects to deliver the final seven of 36 F-35 fighter jets to the U.S. government form its Fort Worth, Texas ,facility before year end, despite a five-day halt in test flights due to bad weather over the past week, the company’s F-35 program manager said Dec. 13.

 

Defense:

Pentagon’s November contracts rose 46 percent as shutdown backlog eased -

Pentagon contracts rose 46 percent last month to $23 billion as the military began clearing a bottle neck caused by October’s partial U.S. government shutdown.

U.S. Army overcharged on Afghan radio parts, audit finds -

The biggest supplier of combat radios for Afghan security forces overcharged the U.S. Army for parts such as transceivers and battery chargers because the service didn’t challenge the pricing, according to the Pentagon’s inspector general.

Despite Pentagon cuts and eye on Pacific, Air Force implored to save the ‘Warthog’ -

The Air Force’s A-10 “Warthog,” which provides close air support for ground troops, has survived enemy anti-aircraft fire for decades but is about to be downed by the budget cutter’s pen.

Blank Spots on the map -

The U.S. military can be a sensitive lot when it comes to the location of their military facilities. With military bases on every continent, in every corner of the world, for the kinds of tasks they perform, it’s no wonder that many of the locations are blacked out and hidden from public view.

 

Veterans:

U.S., Philippine governments reach agreement on Clark Veterans Cemetery -

The American Battle Monuments Commission will soon take over the responsibility of maintaining Clark Veterans Cemetery in the Philippines, said commission spokesman Tim Nosal.

 

Space:

China’s Moon Rover Leaves Its Mark on Lunar Soil -

China’s first moon rover has touched the lunar surface and left deep traces on its loose soil, state media reported Dec. 15, several hours after the country successfully carried out the world’s first soft landing of a space probe on the moon in nearly four decades.

Iran ‘sends monkey to space for second time’ -

Iran says it has successfully sent a monkey into space for the second time this year as part of a programme aimed at manned space flight. President Hassan Rouhani said the monkey – named Fargam, or Auspicious – returned from space in perfect health.

 

International:

United Kingdom: Iraq abuse investigation: just one soldier fined in three years -

A three year criminal investigation into scores of allegations that British troops killed or mistreated Iraqi civilians has so far resulted in just a single fine for a British soldier. The Iraq Historic Allegations Team (IHAT) is investigating more than 140 separate cases of British abuses following the toppling of Saddam Hussein.

Europe is failing to pull its weight in NATO -

Once again, we are told, European defense is at the top of an EU summit agenda. The arguments are familiar – that European nations must do more to contribute to their own security and that with the United States becoming ever more concerned with the Pacific, there is a limit to the load that the American taxpayers will be willing to carry for their European partners.

United Kingdom: Philip Hammond announces new nuclear weapon deals -

Conservative ministers are pushing ahead with the full-scale replacement of Britain’s nuclear weapons, as a report reveals the extent of work under way to build a new fleet of submarines loaded with Trident missiles.

Tony Abbott announces last Australian troops leave Oruzgan -

Australia’s war in Afghanistan is over, with Australian Defence Force combat troops in the air on their way home. Prime Minister Tony Abbott and Defence Minister David Johnston announced Dec .16 that the last Australian troops had left Oruzgan for good.

Germany gets its first female defense minister -

Germany’s new government will feature the country’s first female defense minister and the return of a respected former foreign minister, while Chancellor Angela Merkel’s influential finance chief will stay on as she starts her third term.




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Headlines September 2, 2014

News: Debris yields clues that pilot never ejected - When investigators were finally able to safely enter the crash site of an F-15C “Eagle” fighter jet on the afternoon of Aug. 27, they made a grim discovery that concluded more than 30 hours of searching – the pilot never managed to eject from the aircraft.  ...
 
 

News Briefs September 2, 2014

Pentagon: Iraq operations cost $560 million so far U.S. military operations in Iraq, including airstrikes and surveillance flights, have cost about $560 million since mid-June, the Pentagon said Aug. 29. Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Pentagon press secretary, said the average daily cost has been $7.5 million. He said it began at a much lower...
 
 

Unmanned aircraft partnership reaches major milestone

A team of research students and staff from Warsaw University of Technology have successfully demonstrated the first phase of flight test and integration of unmanned aircraft platforms with an autonomous mission control system. The demonstration marks a significant milestone in a partnership between the university and Lockheed Martin that began earlier this year. This is...
 

 

Raytheon delivers first Block 2 Rolling Airframe Missiles to US Navy

Raytheon delivered the first Block 2 variant of its Rolling Airframe Missile system to the U.S. Navy as part of the company’s 2012 Low Rate Initial Production contract. RAM Block 2 is a significant performance upgrade featuring enhanced kinematics, an evolved radio frequency receiver, and an improved control system. “As today’s threats continue to evolve,...
 
 
Courtesy photograph

Two Vietnam War Soldiers, one from Civil War to receive Medal of Honor

U.S. Army graphic Retired Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. Adkins and former Spc. 4 Donald P. Sloat will receive the Medal of Honor for actions in Vietnam. The White House announced Aug. 26 that Retired Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. A...
 
 

Sparks fly as NASA pushes limits of 3-D printing technology

NASA has successfully tested the most complex rocket engine parts ever designed by the agency and printed with additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, on a test stand at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. NASA engineers pushed the limits of technology by designing a rocket engine injector – a highly complex part that...
 




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