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December 20, 2013

Headlines December 20, 2013

Defense:

General orders review of tracking battlefield awards -

The top U.S. commander for the Persian Gulf has ordered a review of how recommendations for battlefield awards are tracked by the Afghanistan command, which lost the paperwork for a Medal of Honor nominee and for other heroes.

 

Space:

Gaia ‘billion-star surveyor’ lifts off -

Europe has launched the Gaia satellite – one of the most ambitious space missions in history. The 740m-euro observatory lifted off from the Sinnamary complex in French Guiana at 06:12 local time.

 

International:

United Kingdom: Defense cuts making our military a ‘hollow force’ -

The head of the Armed Forces last night condemned ‘negligent’ defence cuts which risk leaving the military ‘a hollow force.’ Gen. Sir Nick Houghton, Chief of the Defence Staff, said there was a huge  danger Britain would have too much  ‘exquisite’ state-of-the-art equipment but not enough troops to man it.

United Kingdom: David Cameron flies to Brussels determined to fight EU drones program -

David Cameron travels to Brussels Dec. 19 intent on fighting plans by the European Union countries to develop its own drone program. An EU summit which starts today is expected to support the idea of a European drone program, but has yet to fund it, according to draft conclusions.

Britain’s military drone base opens its doors for cameras for first time -

Military chiefs have opened the doors to Britain’s drone nerve centre in Lincolnshire for the first time, allowing cameras to see how the unmanned aircraft are operated and the “pilots” who operate them.

Military trial in U.S. being considered for Russian detained in Afghanistan -

The Obama administration is actively considering the use of a military commission in the United States to try a Russian who was captured fighting with the Taliban several years ago and has been held by the U.S. military at a detention facility near Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan, former and current U.S. officials said.




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Headlines September 2, 2014

News: Debris yields clues that pilot never ejected - When investigators were finally able to safely enter the crash site of an F-15C “Eagle” fighter jet on the afternoon of Aug. 27, they made a grim discovery that concluded more than 30 hours of searching – the pilot never managed to eject from the aircraft.  ...
 
 

News Briefs September 2, 2014

Pentagon: Iraq operations cost $560 million so far U.S. military operations in Iraq, including airstrikes and surveillance flights, have cost about $560 million since mid-June, the Pentagon said Aug. 29. Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Pentagon press secretary, said the average daily cost has been $7.5 million. He said it began at a much lower...
 
 

Unmanned aircraft partnership reaches major milestone

A team of research students and staff from Warsaw University of Technology have successfully demonstrated the first phase of flight test and integration of unmanned aircraft platforms with an autonomous mission control system. The demonstration marks a significant milestone in a partnership between the university and Lockheed Martin that began earlier this year. This is...
 

 

Raytheon delivers first Block 2 Rolling Airframe Missiles to US Navy

Raytheon delivered the first Block 2 variant of its Rolling Airframe Missile system to the U.S. Navy as part of the company’s 2012 Low Rate Initial Production contract. RAM Block 2 is a significant performance upgrade featuring enhanced kinematics, an evolved radio frequency receiver, and an improved control system. “As today’s threats continue to evolve,...
 
 
Courtesy photograph

Two Vietnam War Soldiers, one from Civil War to receive Medal of Honor

U.S. Army graphic Retired Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. Adkins and former Spc. 4 Donald P. Sloat will receive the Medal of Honor for actions in Vietnam. The White House announced Aug. 26 that Retired Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. A...
 
 

Sparks fly as NASA pushes limits of 3-D printing technology

NASA has successfully tested the most complex rocket engine parts ever designed by the agency and printed with additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, on a test stand at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. NASA engineers pushed the limits of technology by designing a rocket engine injector – a highly complex part that...
 




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