Space

December 20, 2013

Orbital completes 40th consecutive successful suborbital research rocket mission for NASA

Orbital Sciences Corporation, one of the world’s leading space technology companies, announced today that Orbital’s NASA Sounding Rocket Operations Contract II team at Wallops Island, Va., recently completed its 40th consecutive successful mission over the last 24 months for NASA’s Sounding Rocket Program.

Orbital began operations as the NSROC II prime contractor in October 2010 and has completed a total of 57 missions in the last three years.

The NASA program performs suborbital launch missions in support of astronomy, geophysics, space physics, and Earth and planetary science investigations for NASA’s science disciplines. Science and engineering research missions are also conducted for NASA centers and the Department of Defense. Recent missions include the successful Far-UV imaging of the Comet C/ISON and a high-resolution spectrum survey of the atmosphere of Venus.

“The NSROC II program offers a practical and cost-effective method to develop and refine space science technologies for their eventual use aboard satellite and interplanetary platforms,” said Senior Program Director Joe Schafer of Orbital’s Technical Services Division, which leads the NSROC II program. “We are very pleased with the program’s success since we became the prime industrial partner to NASA and our team looks forward to adding to the current 40 consecutive successful mission record with up to another 20 launches in 2014.”

The NSROC II launch manifest currently includes 55 missions with an average launch rate of about 20 missions per year. These missions are supported by approximately 100 Orbital employees plus 70 subcontract professionals with a primary base of operations at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, augmented by engineers and technicians at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico.

Orbital is responsible for planning, coordinating and carrying out research rocket missions from locations in the U.S. and around the world. In addition to the launches from Wallops, research rocket missions have flown from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico; Poker Flat Rocket Range, Alaska; Naval Air Station Point Mugu, San Nicholas Island, California; Barking Sands, Hawaii; Puerto Rico; Norway; Sweden; Marshall Islands; Australia; Greenland; Brazil; Canada; and Peru.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Lockheed Martin photograph

Lockheed Martin successfully mates NOAA GOES-R satellite modules

Lockheed Martin photograph Lockheed Martin successfully mated together the large system and propulsion modules of the first GOES-R series weather satellite at the companyís Space Systems facilities near Denver, Colo. A team of...
 
 
Image courtesy of NASA/GSFC

NASA Mars spacecraft ready for Sept. 21 orbit insertion

NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft is nearing its scheduled Sept. 21 insertion into Martian orbit after completing a 10-month interplanetary journey of 442 million miles. Flight Controllers at Lockheed M...
 
 

Lockheed Martin-built CLIO satellite successfully launched

The U.S. government’s CLIO satellite, designed and built by Lockheed Martin, was successfully launched today from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Lift-off occurred at 6:10 p.m., MDT, aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V launch vehicle. Initial contact with the satellite was confirmed at 9:08 p.m., MDT. The CLIO system is based on innovative...
 

 

ULA launches 60th Mission from Cape Canaveral

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying the CLIO mission for Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company launched at 8:10†p.m., EDT, Sept. 16 from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. “It is an honor to work with Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company and all of our mission partners to launch this...
 
 
Image courtesy of NASA, ESA, STScI-RCC14-41a

Hubble helps find smallest known galaxy containing supermassive black hole

Image courtesy of NASA, ESA, STScI-RCC14-41a Artist’s View of M60-UCD1 Black Hole.   Astronomers using data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and ground observation have found an unlikely object in an improbable p...
 
 
Image courtesy of NASA/CXC/M. Weiss

NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory finds planet that makes star act deceptively old

Image courtesy of NASA/CXC/M. Weiss A new study from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory shows that a giant exoplanet, WASP-18b, is making the star that it orbits very closely act much older than it actually is. This artist&...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>