Defense

January 15, 2014

Budget uncertainty challenges readiness, official says

SFC Tyrone C. Marshall Jr.
American Forces Press Service

The Defense Department continues to face persisting challenges due to budget uncertainties under sequestration, the Pentagons acquisitions chief said Jan. 15.

Frank Kendall, undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics, spoke to an audience at the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics SciTech conference about force structure and readiness challenges the Pentagon faces under a cloud of fiscal uncertainty.

I cant say much about Ö the budget were going to submit, because we havent submitted it yet, he said. But were obviously working on it and getting ready to do that in the next few weeks. Hopefully, by next week well be out of the continuing resolution world and into the world of executing an actual budget. We got some relief, of course, from sequestration.

Kendall said this year the department will be pretty close to splitting the difference between sequestration numbers and what President Barack Obama requested.

This year we did not start spending as if we were going to get our request, he added. We were spending with an eye on expectations that sequestration might continue. So were in much better shape than we were in last year. But there are still some substantial cuts in there, and they fall disproportionately, Im sure, to parts of the budget.

The acquisitions chief said if the fiscal year 2015 bipartisan budget act governs what happens next year – and right now the indications are that it probably will, he told the audience – the department will be quite a bit closer to sequestration levels.

Well be down to [a cut] within about $10 billion for defense at the sequestration level, Kendall said. It was a $50 billion cut, so were looking at 80 percent of that.

Kendall said the prolonged budget uncertainty due to sequestration continues to cause fundamental problems.

Sequestration is not being repealed, Kendall said. Were modifying that a little bit for [fiscal years 2014 and 2015], but after that, the law remains at the sequester levels.

Sequestration levels, he said, are not the funding levels the Defense Department needs.

The [fiscal 2015] level, if it persists or prevails, is well below what we need to defend the country, Kendall said. Even this year, of course, were below what wed like to have — what we thought we needed under the strategy we put out about two years ago now. The uncertainty is causing some pretty fundamental problems for us.

Until the Pentagon has some idea of the budgets trajectory and where it will end, he said, its difficult to do serious planning. The driving factor in our planning is the size of our force structure, he explained. Everything flows from that. So we dont know where were going to be able to end up in terms of force structure that we can support.

Kendall said the department will end up keeping force structure in the hopes that it can be retained, but he added that this isnt the right course for the departments health. If we know where were going to end up, he said, we can decide to get to that level of force structure that we can support longer-term right away.

But given the uncertainty, he added, the tendency is to hang onto force structure.

What I think you will probably see us doing is taking steps to start to bring it down, he told the conference audience. Its the only prudent thing for us to do.

The acquisitions chief was cautious about getting ahead of the president and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel in terms of speculating where the budget will go, but he emphasized the impact of hanging onto force structure. If we hang onto more force structure than we can afford, he said, it means that the other accounts, besides pay and joint operations, have to pay the bills.

All of these effects, Kendall warned, could lead to a hollow force and a readiness crisis.

I lived the readiness crisis of the 70s, he said. I know exactly what its like to have a hollow force because of readiness. But thats not the only way we can have a hollow force.

Failing to invest in science and technology to stay ahead in the world is another route to a hollow force, Kendall said, as is relying on aging equipment thats hard to maintain.

So theres a number of ways you can have a hollow force, he said. Readiness is just one of them.

Kendall said Pentagon officials are trying to avoid that.

But frankly, he added, if we stay on the path that were on, I think that we will, at least in the short term, until we can get back into balance, have a hollow force because of this.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines December 19, 2014

News: SpaceX’s attempt to land rocket on floating barge postponed - It’s set to be one of the most groundbreaking moments in humanity’s six decades of space exploration. Obama signs $1.1 trillion spending bill into law - President Obama signed the $1.1 trillion federal spending measure into law Dec. 16, officially ending any threat of a government...
 
 

News Briefs December 19, 2014

Trial set for ex-Navy engineer in military secrets case A former Navy civilian engineer is scheduled to stand trial next summer on charges of trying to steal aircraft carrier schematics. Media outlets report that 35-year-old Mostafa Awwad of Yorktown, Va., pleaded not guilty Dec. 17 to two counts of attempted exportation of defense articles and...
 
 
Army photograph by C. Todd Lopez

Army to launch cruise missile-detecting aerostat at Aberdeen Proving Ground

Army photograph by C. Todd Lopez The Army plans to launch an aerostat, part of the “Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor,” in late December 2014. The JLENS aerostat will be tethered to the...
 

 
Air Force photograph by SrA. Jordan Castelan

AF delivers Iraqi F-16s for training in US

Air Force photograph by SrA. Jordan Castelan Iraqi air force captain Hama conducts preflight inspections while inside a new to service Iraqi F-16 Fighting Falcon Dec. 17, 2014, located at the nearby Tucson International Airport...
 
 
Air Force photograph by SSgt. Derek VanHorn

Short-notice: A new way to exercise

Air Force photograph by SSgt. Derek VanHorn Airmen from Kadena Air Base, Japan, prepare for an aeromedical evacuation exercise on a KC-135 Stratotanker Dec. 5, 2014, at Misawa Air Base, Japan. The operation was executed in supp...
 
 
Lockheed Martin photograph by Andy Wolfe

Japan, Australia to provide F-35 maintenance sites in Pacific region

Lockheed Martin photograph by Andy Wolfe An F-35C Lightning II joint strike fighter carrier variant prepares to launch from the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz in the Pacific Ocean, Nov. 6, 2014. Japan and Australia will be sharing...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>