Space

January 29, 2014

NASA selects physical science research proposals for space station

NASA’s Physical Science Research Program will fund seven proposals to conduct physics research using the agency’s new microgravity laboratory, which is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in 2016.

NASA’s Cold Atom Laboratory will provide an opportunity to study ultra-cold quantum gases in the microgravity environment of the space station – a frontier in scientific research that is expected to reveal interesting and novel quantum phenomena.

This environment makes it possible to conduct research in a way unachievable on Earth because atoms can be observed over a longer period, mixtures of different atoms can be studied free of the effects of gravity, where cold atoms can be trapped more easily by magnetic fields.

The chosen proposals came from research teams, which include three Nobel laureates, in response to NASA’s research announcement “Research Opportunities in Fundamental Physics.” The proposals will receive a total of about $12.7 million over a four- to five-year period. Development of selected experiments will begin immediately.

Five of the selected proposals will involve flight experiments using the CAL aboard the space station, following ground-based research activities to prepare the experiments for flight. Two of the selected proposals call for ground-based research to help NASA plan for future flight experiments.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., is developing the Cold Atom Laboratory. The facility is managed by the International Space Station Program at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

The Space Life and Physical Sciences Division of NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington manages the Physical Science Research Program.

For a complete list of the selected proposals, principal investigators and organizations, visit http://go.nasa.gov/M6hcRp.




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