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February 3, 2014

Headlines – February 3, 2014

News:

NATO chief doesn’t see Karzai signing security pact -

President Hamid Karzai is unlikely to sign a pact for U.S. and NATO forces to stay in Afghanistan after 2014 and will probably leave the choice for his successor, NATO chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen said Feb. 1.

 

Business:

Air Force looking for JSTARS recapitalization -

The Air Force hopes to develop a new JSTARS surveillance aircraft based on a business jet, one which could be operational as soon as 2022.

The end of the tank? The Army says it doesn’t need it, but industry wants to keep building it -

When an armored vehicle pulled down the statue of Saddam Hussein in an iconic moment of the Iraq War, it triggered a wave of pride here at the BAE Systems plant where that rig was built. The Marines who rolled to glory in it even showed up to pay their regards to the factory workers. 

Merger prospects still murky after Murray-Ryan deal -

Since the U.S. Budget Control Act created the specter of sequestration in August 2011, very few deals have been struck to sell or merge defense companies. The refrain has been that budget uncertainty was leaving many risk averse and timid.

Market for service contracts shrinking, and so is number of competitors -

Facing a steep decline in government spending on support contractors, companies in this sector are rushing to consolidate and cut expense as price-based competitions become the norm in service contracts.

 

Defense:

Bypassing Congress on defense cuts -

The Pentagon has learned that if it can’t go through Congress to get what it wants, sometimes it’s best to try going around.

Pentagon to further study four possible East Coast missile defense sites -

The U.S. Defense Department said on Friday it would conduct environmental impact studies for four possible missile defense sites in the eastern United States but stressed it had not yet decided to proceed with construction. 

Scout mission compromised by funding cut -

U.S. Army leadership is betting that an 80 percent solution to its aerial scout needs will be good enough in the coming years, as it scraps its OH-58 Kiowa helicopter fleet in favor of a manned-unmanned mixture for peering over the next ridgeline. 

X-47B will pair with manned aircraft in testing later this year -

The U.S. Navy plans to take the Northrop Grumman X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System-Demonstrator aircraft out to sea onboard an aircraft carrier this summer to test how well it operates together with manned aircraft around the ship and on the flight deck. 

Carrier Forrestal headed for scrap heap -

The decommisioned carrier Forrestal, the first of the Navy’s “supercarriers” and a technological marvel when it was launched in the 1950s, will begin its final journey on February 4th when it is towed out of Philadelphia for a trip to Brownsville, Texas, where the ship will be dismantled and recycled. 

Air Combat Command’s challenge: Buy new or modernize older aircraft -

After a tense budget battle last year, the Air Force is gearing up to defend what service officials have called a series of hard choices about what to keep and what to dump. With finances tight, the biggest fight is over whether to modernize older platforms or risk a capabilities gap while pushing that funding toward recapitalization programs. 

Platform, personnel cuts likely in fiscal 2015 Air Force budget -

This close to the March 4 submission of the fiscal 2015 budget request, getting specifics from service officials can be like pulling teeth. But a number of statements, both in public appearances and during interviews, provide a sense of direction for the Air Force’s plans. 

The F-22 is the air dominance cream of the crop: U.S. Air Force intends to keep it that way -

Though there are potential fifth generation challengers on the horizon, pilots and maintainers of the stealthy F-22 Raptor say they’ll own the competitive edge in air combat for years to come, not just because of the advanced technology embodied in their fighter but because of their comprehensive training.

 

Veterans:

What does a collection of 100,000 American war letters teach us? -

Over the course of 15 years Andrew Carroll has collected more than 100,000 letters by US soldiers from every war in America’s history. The project began as a personal quest to preserve wartime correspondence and all it reflects about war.

 

Space:

Plato planet-hunter in pole position -

A telescope to find thousands of planets beyond our Solar System is the hot favorite for selection as Europe’s next medium-class science mission. 

Urthecast’s U.K.-built cameras attached to outside of space station -

Two British-built Earth-observation cameras have been successfully installed on the outside of the International Space Station. The cameras will be operated by the Canadian Urthecast company, which intends to stream high-resolution video of the planet to web users.

 

International:

U.S. ready to assist Poland with indigenous missile defense system -

The United States wants to partner with Poland as the Eastern European nation pursues its own missile defense system separate from the American system already planned for the region. 

American tanks return to Europe after brief leave -

Less than a year after they left European soil, American tanks have returned to military bases in Germany where they had been a heavy presence since World War II. 

U.K., French leaders agree to cooperate on drone, missile, more -

Britain and France agreed Jan. 31 to invest £200 million (US $329 million) for two-year studies on a future combat drone, and signed up for work on an anti-ship missile and an anti-mine system, French government and industry sources said. 

Unfunded F-16 upgrades put jet’s combat value in doubt -

As officials in Taiwan’s Ministry of National Defense were busying themselves for Chinese New Year celebrations last week, they received potentially devastating news for the Pacific nation’s air defense plans.

 

Viewpoint:

China’s deceptively weak (and dangerous) military -

While recent years have witnessed a tremendous Chinese propaganda effort aimed at convincing the world that the PRC is a serious military player that is owed respect, outsiders often forget that China does not even have a professional military. 

Century of violence: What World War I did to the Middle East -

World War I may have ended in 1918, but the violence it triggered in the Middle East still hasn’t come to an end. Arbitrary borders drawn by self-interested imperial powers have left a legacy that the region has not been able to overcome.




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Headlines December 17, 2014

News: U.S. Air Force tanker platform slated for year-end debut - Boeing is planning for first flight of its 767-2C – upon which the U.S. Air Force’s new KC-46 tanker will be based – by year’s end, six months late. Northrop Grumman wins $657.4 million deal to supply drones to South Korea - Northrop Grumman has won...
 
 

NASA launches new Micro-g NExT for undergraduates

NASA is offering undergraduate students an opportunity to participate in a new microgravity activity called Micro-g Neutral Buoyancy Experiment Design Teams. The deadline for proposals is Jan. 28, 2015. Micro-g NExT challenges students to work in teams to design and build prototypes of spacewalking tools to be used by astronauts for spacewalk training in the...
 
 
launch1

Storm fails to quench liftoff of secret reconnaissance satellite

The fiery launch of an Atlas V (541), among the most powerful of the venerable Atlas family, briefly dispelled the gloom over Californiaís Central Coast on the evening of Dec. 12. A team of personnel from United Launch Allianc...
 

 
Coast Guard photograph

Navy demonstrates unmanned helicopter operations aboard Coast Guard cutter

http://static.dvidshub.net/media/video/1412/DOD_102145893/DOD_102145893-512×288-442k.mp4 Coast Guard photograph An MQ-8B Fire Scout UAS is tested off the Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf near Los Angeles, Dec. 5 2014. The Coast...
 
 
GPS-OCX

GPS III, OCX successfully demonstrate key satellite command, control capabilities

Lockheed Martin and Raytheon successfully completed the fourth of five planned launch and early orbit exercises to demonstrate new automation capabilities, information assurance and launch readiness of the worldís most powerfu...
 
 

Aerojet Rocketdyne successfully demonstrates 3D printed rocket propulsion system for satellites

Aerojet Rocketdyne has successfully completed a hot-fire test of its MPS-120 CubeSat High-Impulse Adaptable Modular Propulsion System. The MPS-120 is the first 3D-printed hydrazine integrated propulsion system and is designed to provide propulsion for CubeSats, enabling missions not previously available to these tiny satellites. The project was funded out of the NASA Office of Chief...
 




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