Space

February 5, 2014

Remembering those who sacrificed their lives for space exploration

The flags of the State of Texas and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and a wreath stand in tribute to the memorial tree planted in Fullerton’s honor at the Johnson Space Center’s memorial grove during JSC’s Day of Remembrance observance Jan. 30.

Jan. 31, 2014, NASA commemorated the men and women lost in the pursuit of space exploration and discovery during its annual Day of Remembrance.

At wreath-laying ceremonies at the Arlington National Cemetery outside Washington, NASA administrator Charlie Bolden paid tribute to the legacy of the STS-107 Columbia crew; the STS-51L Challenger crew; the Apollo 1 crew; and to Mike Adams, the first in-flight fatality of the space program as he piloted the X-15 No. 3 on a research flight.

Those honored include:
Apollo 1 (Jan. 27, 1967): Astronauts Roger B. Chaffee, Virgil ìGusî Grissom and Edward H. White Jr.
Challenger (Jan. 28, 1986): Astronauts Francis R. ìDickî Scobee, Michael J. Smith, Judith A. Resnik, Ronald E. McNair, Ellison S. Onizuka, Gregory B. Jarvis and S. Christa McAuliffe
Columbia (Feb. 1, 2003): Astronauts Rick D. Husband, William C. McCool, Michael P. Anderson, David M. Brown, Kalpana Chawla, Laurel B. Clark and Ilan Ramon
X-15 No. 3 (Nov. 15, 1967): Maj. Michael J. Adams, U.S. Air Force

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden participates in a wreath laying ceremony as part of NASA’s Day of Remembrance, Jan. 31, 2014, at Arlington National Cemetery. The wreaths were laid in memory of those men and women who lost their lives in the quest for space exploration.

“These men and women were our friends, family and colleagues, and we will never forget their lives and passion to push us farther and achieve more,” said Bolden in a Day of Remembrance message to employees.†”We see our lost friends in the strivings of so many missions to take humans to new destinations and to unlock the secrets of our universe. And we honor them by making our dreams of a better tomorrow reality and by acting to improve life for all of humanity.”

As part of its Day of Remembrance observance, NASA’s Johnson Space Center held a memorial tree-planting ceremony Jan. 30 in honor of the late space shuttle astronaut and research pilot C. Gordon “Gordo” Fullerton. Fullerton, who died in August 2013 at the age of 76, flew on two space shuttle missions ñ STS-3 on Columbia and STS-51F on Challenger – flew the shuttle Approach and Landing Tests on Enterprise at Edwards Air Force Base in 1977, and served as a research pilot for 22 years at NASA’s Dryden Flight Research Center.

Among those participating in the ceremonies were retired astronauts Robert Crippen and Fred Haise, JSC director Ellen Ochoa and Fullerton’s widow Marie, each of whom deposited a ceremonial shovelful of mulch around the tree planted in Gordon Fullerton’s honor. Like Fullerton, Haise served as a research pilot at NASA’s Flight Research Center. However, Haise’s tenure at the center preceded his astronaut career, while Fullerton came to the center, by then renamed for Hugh L. Dryden and soon to be renamed for Neil A. Armstrong, following his years as a NASA astronaut.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
NASA, ESA, PSI, JHU/APL, STScI/AURA image

Close encounters: Comet Siding Spring seen next to Mars

NASA, ESA, PSI, JHU/APL, STScI/AURA image This composite NASA Hubble Space Telescope Image captures the positions of comet Siding Spring and Mars in a never-before-seen close passage of a comet by the Red Planet, which happened...
 
 

NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly shares bullying prevention message ahead of one-year mission

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, who is scheduled to fly on a one-year spaceflight mission in 2015, is lending his voice to help reduce childhood bullying. As part of Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, Kelly recorded a special message encouraging bystanders to take action. “Be more than just a bystander,” said Kelly in the message. “Take action...
 
 

NASA seeks ultra-lightweight materials to help enable journey to Mars

NASA is seeking proposals to develop and manufacture ultra-lightweight materials for aerospace vehicles and structures of the future. Proposals will demonstrate lower-mass alternatives to honeycomb or foam cores currently used in composite sandwich structures. Composite sandwich structures are a special type of material made by attaching two thin skins to a lightweight core. This type...
 

 

Boeing concludes commercial crew space act agreement for CST-100/Atlas V

Boeing has successfully completed the final milestone of its Commercial Crew Integrated Capability Space Act Agreement with NASA. The work and testing completed under the agreement resulted in significant maturation of Boeing’s crew transportation system, including the CST-100 spacecraft and Atlas V rocket. NASA in July approved the Critical Design Review Board milestone for Boeing’...
 
 

NASA partners with leading technology innovators to enable future exploration

Recognizing that technology drives exploration, NASA has selected four teams of agency technologists for participation in the Early Career Initiative pilot program. The program encourages creativity and innovation among early career NASA technologists by engaging them in hands-on technology development opportunities needed for future missions. NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate c...
 
 

New commercial rocket descent data may help NASA with future Mars landings

NASA successfully captured thermal images of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on its descent after it launched in September from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The data from these thermal images may provide critical engineering information for future missions to the surface of Mars. “Because the technologies required to land large payloads on Mars...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>