Business

February 10, 2014

Raytheon’s Excalibur Ib demonstrates production maturity and effectiveness in milestone test event

The U.S. Army and Raytheon successfully fired 30 GPS-guided Excalibur Ib projectiles during an extensive First Article Test series at Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz.

This test series validated performance and reliability of the Excalibur Ib production configuration, and moves the program toward full-rate production.

“Excalibur gives the warfighter a pinpoint precision tool to eliminate enemy threats and is the only combat-proven 155mm precision-guided projectile in the world today,” said Lt. Col. Josh Walsh, U.S. Army Excalibur program manager. “This weapon continues to prove itself in testing but, more importantly, it continues to prove itself on the battlefield.”

During the testing, gunners fired Excalibur Ib projectiles from the Paladin and M777 howitzers to various targets at ranges from 7 to 38 kilometers. Average miss distance for the 30 projectiles was 1.6 meters.

“These tests and other recent trials clearly demonstrate Excalibur’s ability to deliver true precision to any 155mm howitzer and the decisive advantage Excalibur provides the warfighter,” said Michelle Lohmeier, vice president of Raytheon’s Land Warfare Systems product line. “The first round effects demonstrated by Excalibur provide an all-weather, immediate response, precision strike capability for the maneuver force.† Its efficiency increases operational effectiveness, reduces the unit’s logistics burden and can improve deployability of the force.”

Raytheon has also funded a program to augment its combat-proven 155 mm GPS-guided projectile with a laser spot tracker, giving the weapon a dual-mode GPS/LST guidance capability. The company is planning a live-fire demonstration of the “Excalibur-S” in early 2014. Laser guidance will mitigate target location errors and support attack of mobile targets, and can ensure precision effects when GPS is either degraded or denied.

Excalibur is a 155mm precision-guided, extended-range projectile that uses GPS guidance to provide accurate, first-round effects capability in any environment. By using Excalibur’s level of precision, there is a major reduction in the time, cost and logistical burden associated with using other artillery munitions. With nearly 700 projectiles fired in theater to date, Excalibur is the revolutionary precision projectile for the U.S. Army and Marines. Analyses have shown it can take 10 to 50 conventional munitions to accomplish what one Excalibur can.

Excalibur is a cooperative program between Raytheon and BAE Systems Bofors AB.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines July 7, 2015

News: F-35 loses dogfight to fighter jet from 1980s – A new report alleges that an F-35A was defeated by the very aircraft it is meant to replace.   Business: South Korea selects Airbus for $1.33 billion tanker contract – European aerospace giant Airbus won a $1.33 billion deal June 30 to supply air refueling...
 
 
U.S. Chamber of Commerce photograph

Boeing, Embraer to collaborate on ecoDemonstrator technology tests

U.S. Chamber of Commerce photograph Frederico Curado, president & CEO of Embraer, and Marc Allen, president of Boeing International, at the Brazil-U.S. Business Summit in Washington, D.C. The event occurred during an offici...
 
 
Untitled-2

Tactical reconnaissance vehicle project eyes hoverbike for defense

The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, or ARL, has been exploring the tactical reconnaissance vehicle, or TRV, concept for nearly nine months and is evaluating the hoverbike technology as a way to get Soldiers away from ground thre...
 

 
Air Force photograph by SSgt. William Banton

Upgraded AWACS platform tested at Northern Edge

Air Force photograph by SSgt. William Banton Maintenance crew members prepare an E-3G Sentry (AWACS) for takeoff during exercise Northern Edge June 25, 2015. Roughly 6,000 airmen, soldiers, sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen ...
 
 
LM-Legion

Lockheed Martin’s Legion Pod™ takes to skies

Lockheed Martin photograph by Randy Crites Lockheed Martin’s Legion Pod recently completed its first flight test, successfully tracking multiple airborne targets while flying on an F-16 in Fort Worth, Texas. Legion Pod was in...
 
 
Air Force photograph by SSgt. Marleah Robertson

First Marine graduates Air Force’s F-35 intelligence course

Air Force photograph by SSgt. Marleah Robertson Marine Corps 1st Lt. Samuel Winsted, an F-35B Lightning II intelligence officer, provides a mock intelligence briefing to two instructors during the F-35 Intelligence Formal Train...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>