Business

February 12, 2014

Insitu releases latest version of common command, control system

Insitu announced Feb. 12 the 2.0 release of ICOMC2, the company’s innovative, small-footprint common command and control system.

Since its introduction in 2012, ICOMC2 has redefined the Unmanned Aircraft System control concept. It enables a single operator to control multiple unmanned vehicles using small-footprint, mobile hardware and features an open-architecture design that users can customize with plug-ins and new applications.

ICOMC2 2.0 includes a mission commander mode, which increases situational awareness and integrates with other C4ISR systems, enabling ICOMC2 to provide or receive tasking between Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance systems.

ICOMC2 2.0 features a high-performance, lightweight mapping engine, a full-featured Software Development Kit, lower memory footprint for mobile usage, and new video formats.

“ICOMC2 2.0 represents how Insitu is leading the way with small-footprint technology that is flexible and scalable,” said Ryan Hartman, senior vice president, Insitu programs. “This technology signifies a quantum leap for customers by providing a UAS system that can task, process, exploit and disseminate information and effects to end users.”

Through the ICOMC2 Registered Developers Program, third parties receive support developing plug-ins for the system’s core. The program also supports the University Partnerships Program, a cost-effective solution for colleges and universities that want to offer courses or degrees in unmanned technology.

Insitu Inc., located†in Bingen, Wash., is a wholly owned subsidiary of Boeing..




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