Space

February 21, 2014

Saabs Carl-Gustaf man-portable weapon system selected as standard issue for U.S. Army

Defense and security company Saab’s man-portable weapon system Carl-Gustaf has been chosen by the U.S. Department of the Army to be a Program of Record within the U.S. Army.

This means that the world leading shoulder fired weapon system, with a long service record with the U.S. Special Operations Forces, will now become standard issue to the U.S. Army’s Light Infantry units.

The Carl-Gustaf system will provide the U.S. Army with a capability that units using disposable shoulder fired munitions currently lack. This system has been a key component of the U.S. Special Operations Forces for over twenty years.

“The fact that the U.S. Army has now elected to designate Carl-Gustaf (M3 MAAWS in the U.S.) as a Program of Record, thereby enabling it to be broadly fielded to its light Infantry units speaks for itself. The Carl-Gustaf has repeatedly proven itself in the world’s most demanding environments as a versatile, powerful tool for the infantry soldier,” says Jonas Hjelm, president of Saab North America.

A true multi-role, man-portable shoulder-fired weapon, the Carl-Gustaf weapon system is currently in use in more than 40 countries worldwide.

The highly modern system has a long and successful history, and it has been continuously modernized to adapt to the users’ ever changing needs.

Anticipating future operational needs, Saab is constantly working to make a great system even better. A new, lighter weight version of the Carl-Gustaf is currently under development.

Furthermore, advances are also being made to the Carl-Gustaf ammunition family with the recent release of the new 655 CS (Confined Space) High Explosive Anti-Tank (HEAT) round. This is the first in a new generation of munitions for the Carl-Gustaf designed to reduce back blast. This will allow soldiers to safely employ the weapon in confined spaces, minimizing the hazardous effects of traditional shoulder fired munitions.




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