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March 5, 2014

News Briefs March 5, 2014

U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,176

As of March 3, 2014, at least 2,176 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count.
At least 1,796 military service members have died in Afghanistan as a result of hostile action, according to the military’s numbers.

Outside of Afghanistan, the department reports at least 133 more members of the U.S. military died in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Of those, 11 were the result of hostile action.
The Defense Department also counts three military civilian deaths.

Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 19,665 U.S. service members have been wounded in hostile action, according to the Defense Department. AP

Air Force Academy begins another cheating probe

The Air Force Academy in Colorado is conducting its fourth probe of cheating at the school since 2004.

Academy officials said March 3 about 40 cadets may have copied portions of a lab report assignment.

Superintendent Lt. Gen. Michelle D. Johnson said in a statement that any cadets found guilty will be held accountable.

The disclosure follows separate investigations launched by the U.S. Air Force in January after dozens of nuclear missile officers at Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana allegedly cheated on their launch proficiency exams.

The alleged cheating, which was disclosed by Air Force officials, was the latest in a string of nuclear missteps revealed last year by The Associated Press. AP

North Korea fires seven suspected artillery shells

South Korea said North Korea fired seven suspected artillery shells into the ocean March 4, in what Seoul called a provocation apparently directed against its ongoing military drills with the United States.

North Korea also has launched six Scud missiles into the sea since the annual exercises began about a week ago. It earlier fired artillery shells days before the drills started. It says the exercises are a rehearsal for invasion, but Washington and Seoul say they are defensive in nature.

Despite the firings and launches, outside analysts say the North is taking a softer stance toward the drills this year than last year because it wants better ties with the outside world to revive its struggling economy.

Three of the projectiles fired Tuesday had a range of 50 kilometers (30 miles) and four could travel about 155 kilometers (95 miles), according to Seoul’s Defense Ministry. Spokesman Kim Min-seok said the various launches were apparently an ìarmed protestî by North Korea against the drills.

The Korean Peninsula remains officially at war because the 1950-53 Korean War ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty. Tension spiked sharply a year ago as North Korea responded furiously to last year’s drills and to international condemnation of its third nuclear test in February 2013. AP




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Headlines January 30, 2015

News: Taliban claims responsibility for attack on Americans at military base near airport - The Taliban claimed responsibility Jan. 30 for a shooting incident at a military base attached to Kabul’s international airport yesterday that killed three American civilian contractors and an Afghan national, saying the attacker had infiltrated the ranks of the security forces. Commission...
 
 

News Briefs January 30, 2015

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Air Force photograph by 1st Lt. Jake Bailey

Cope South experts exchange knowledge, techniques

Air Force photograph by 1st Lt. Jake Bailey TSgt. Sam Bishop, center left, and SSgt. Jeffrey Stephens discuss propeller maintenance with Bangladesh air force maintainers, from the 101st Special Flying Unit, during exercise Cope...
 

 

Air Force names 2-star to lead F-35 Integration Office

With the initial operating capability date of the F-35 Lightning II quickly approaching, the Air Force appointed Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Harrigian as the director of a larger Air Force F-35 Integration Office, Feb. 1. In addition to gaining new leadership, the F-35 Integration Office will also grow from a staff of four to 12 and...
 
 
boeing-ana2

Boeing announces ANA’s commitment to more jetliners

Airline continues fleet modernization with Boeing airplanes Boeing and All Nippon Airways announced Jan. 30 the airline’s intent to purchase three 787-10 Dreamliners to add additional flexibility to the airline’s 787 fleet....
 
 
Air Force photograph by Scott M. Ash

Air Force risks becoming too small to succeed under sequestration

Air Force photograph by Scott M. Ash Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III testifies before the Senate Armed Services Committee Jan. 28, 2015, in Washington, D.C., as Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Joesph F. Dunf...
 




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